News from the U.S. Interagency Council on Homelessness


What Three Communities Are Learning About Ending Homelessness for People in Encampments

  
In 2015, we released Ending Homelessness for People in Encampments: Advancing the Dialogue, to help communities develop coordinated strategies to create lasting solutions for people living, unsheltered, in encampments.
We recently checked in with Dallas, Chicago, and Philadelphia to see what lessons they could share from their efforts.  

How Virginia Uses Collaboration and Coordination to End Homelessness Statewide    
 
Between 2010 and 2016, the Commonwealth of Virginia reduced overall homelessness by 31% and family homelessness by 37.6%. And in November 2015, they became the first state to effectively end Veteran homelessness.

Pamela Kestner and Kathy Robertson describe how the Commonwealth has used a state-level Coordinating Council to drive change and progress.  
   

Forging Strong Public-Private Partnerships to End Homelessness 



Working in tandem, public and private entities can use resources more effectively, identify and close gaps, and develop a shared understanding of what works best for a wide range of issues.

Amanda Andere, CEO of Funders Together to End Homelessness, shares some examples of public-private partnerships around the country that are getting results in ending homelessness. 


Use Our Updated Supportive Housing Opportunities Planner Tool!     

  
Supportive housing is key to ending homelessness among people with disabilities experiencing long-term or repeated episodes of homelessness. 

Does your community have enough supportive housing available or in the pipeline? Can you have an even greater impact with your current or projected supply?  

Use our planning tool to find out!

U.S. Interagency Council on Homelessness, 1275 First Street, NE, Suite 227, Washington, DC 20552

CAN Financial Workshop 5/8, 11am (Baltimore County, MD)


SNAPS In Focus: FY 2016 CoC Program Competition Recap

As we move into the FY 2017 Continuum of Care (CoC) Program competition, I want to reflect on the FY 2016 competition. The factors that influenced the FY 2016 competition were the same as the ones I cited in my recap message from the last competition: policy goals, congressional directives to be more competitive, and research. Our driving value continues to be increasing progress towards ending homelessness for all populations while ensuring that the programs we fund are as effective and efficient as possible.
As Ann stated in her January message, those of us working in HUD’s Office of Special Needs Assistance (SNAPS) and across the government on the issue of homelessness are deeply committed to working towards ending homelessness across the nation. We are constantly working to improve our programs, make them more effective, and find ways to serve more people with our resources. The FY 2016 CoC Program competition had a few key changes:
  • We set a Tier 1 threshold of 93% (up from 85% in FY 2015) of each CoC’s Annual Renewal Demand (ARD) amount.
     
  • We reduced the bonus amount to 5% of Final Pro-Rata Need.
     
  • We modified the project-level scoring based on project type to increase the emphasis on how the community ranked the project and reduced the emphasis on the project type and the CoC Score.
It was also evident by the caliber of both CoC and project applications that we received, that CoCs are improving their performance. I was impressed by how well many CoCs used data to prioritize projects that will ultimately lead to better outcomes. CoCs that scored well were able to increase assistance for people experiencing homelessness in their communities. There are also communities who lost funding in FY 2016 who face the difficult task for finding alternative funding for, reducing, or closing down longstanding programs. Like last year, HUD will provide guidance and technical assistance to help with this process.

Initial Outcomes of the FY 2016 CoC Program Competition

Here are some of our initial estimates of outcomes of the competition:
  • Funding for permanent supportive housing projects increased by approximately $26 million to $1.43 billion. From 2014 to 2016 we have increased the number of permanent supportive housing units by 10% (from 113,180 to 124,371) and the number of beds dedicated to chronic homelessness by 50% (from 60,262 in FY 2014 to 90,317 in FY 2016).
     
  • Funding for rapid re-housing projects continued to increase, up to nearly $250 million. We estimate that this funding will serve approximately 17,000 more households experiencing homelessness than with FY 2015 funding.
     
  • Funding for transitional housing projects declined by $66 million from FY 2015 with 90% of this decrease being from reallocation at the CoC level.
     
  • As a result of these changes, 22% more households will be served in CoC Program-funded permanent housing and transitional housing programs combined compared to 2014.
     
  • The CoC Program is serving people more efficiently with permanent housing and transitional housing programs combining to serve 14% more households per dollar spent than with grants funded in FY 2014.
We also analyzed the number of projects that plan to serve people fleeing domestic violence. Funding for transitional housing projects has declined while funding has increased for rapid re-housing and permanent supportive housing targeting people fleeing domestic violence. As a whole, CoC funded projects will serve approximately 7 percent more households fleeing domestic violence in residential programs than last year.

Preliminary CoC and Project Score Observations

Hopefully you have had the opportunity to participate in one of the regional debriefing webinars that SNAPS offered in February and each CoC should have received a debriefing summary outlining how they scored on each section of the CoC Application. Here are a few observations:
  • Of the 200 points possible, the median score was 154.5, and the weighted mean score was 160.7. There were many factors that influenced a CoC’s score, but the most important one was improving the performance of the CoC, especially in reducing the number of people experiencing homelessness and improving permanent housing outcomes.
     
  • There were many smaller CoCs that had low CoC scores, and it is clear that many do not have enough capacity to take full advantage of the CoC program. CoCs that have scored poorly in the last two CoC Competitions should consider merging with Balance of State or other CoCs.
     
  • This was the first year that CoCs had to report on system performance measurements. Although we did not evaluate the actual outcomes reflected in the system performance measures, we hope CoCs use this information to make system-level improvements moving forward.
CoC score was a large factor for the Tier 2 project score but there were other factors that affected whether individual projects ranked in Tier 2 received funding:
  • Project Ranking – How a CoC ranked a project was a major factor in determining whether it was funded. A project that was ranked at the top of Tier 2 was much more likely to be funded than one at the bottom of Tier 2. The CoC ranking process continues to be a crucial part of the funding process, and CoCs should be continually strengthening their process for ensuring that projects are ranked based on their performance and the needs they address in a community.
     
  • Housing First Practices - Projects that committed to using housing first practices received more points and were more likely to be funded than those that did not. Overall, a much higher proportion of Tier 2 projects were fully utilizing housing first practices in FY 2016 (93%) than in FY 2015 (78%).
     
  • Project Types – The type of project that a CoC applied for was a smaller factor in determining whether a project received funding than it was in FY 2015. Transitional housing projects (except for those that serve youth) and supportive services only (SSO) projects (except for those for coordinated entry) received fewer points than other project types. This provided an incentive for CoCs to reallocate from those project types to create new permanent housing, Homeless Management Information System (HMIS), and SSO-coordinated entry projects.
I want to close by thanking our many partners in communities. You make very challenging decisions that affect many people’s lives. Your work to end homelessness has resulted in large declines in homelessness over the past decade, and it has positioned us to continue that progress in the future. There is much more work ahead, but together, I am confident that we can finally and forever end homelessness.
Thank you.
Norm Suchar
Director
Office of Special Needs Assistance Programs
         
Visit the HUD Exchange at https://www.hudexchange.info

JOBS: HMIS Program Coordinator (AL)


Afternoon!

I've been asked to forward this job posting on behalf of a CoC in Alabama that is looking for a new HMIS Program Coordinator: http://aansocial.org/jobs2017/job/promisse-program-coordinator/

Regards,

Dan Fox
Analyst, Housing and Community Development
Solutions for Health | Housing | Land
240-582-3639 (Direct)
Connect with us: Website | Twitter | LinkedIn 


Resources Spotlight Association Between Chronic Illnesses and Depression in Youth



SAMHSA Logo

SAMHSA Spotlights Association Between Chronic Illness and Depression in Youth


Today, SAMHSA debuts several one-page "Spotlights" to accompany a major report on the association between a major depressive episode and chronic conditions such as diabetes, asthma, and obesity. The full report and four "Spotlights" are being released in recognition of National Children's Mental Health Awareness Day (Awareness Day). This year's Awareness Day theme, "Partnering for Help and Hope," focuses on the importance of integrating behavioral health and primary care for children, youth, and young adults with mental and/or substance use disorders.
Spotlights:
View the Full Report


FY 2016 CoC Award Summary Reports and CoC Award Data Now Available

The CoC Award Summary Reports by Program Type are now available on the HUD Exchange for the FY 2016 CoC Program awards. 
Information about CoC awards is also available using the redesigned HUD Awards and Allocations page.
CoC Award Summary Reports provide snapshots of annual award data broken down by eligible program component types. The reports, which can be filtered to show a specific CoC’s or State’s program components, also display the amount and percentage of new and renewal projects. Additionally, the FY 2016 award reports for each CoC include project level award information.
These reports are also accessible from the CoC Program Reports, Program Data, and Program Rents page on the HUD Exchange.
         
Visit the HUD Exchange at https://www.hudexchange.info

FY 2017 CoC Program Grant Inventory Worksheet Change Forms – Due to Field Offices Today, Thursday, May 4, 2017

HUD has posted the Fiscal Year (FY) 2017 Continuum of Care Program (CoC) Competition Grant Inventory Worksheets (GIWs) to the HUD Exchange for review by CoCs, project recipients, and interested stakeholders. HUD’s Office of Special Needs Assistance Programs (SNAPS) changed the GIW process to make the process both easier and transparent. SNAPS completed a thorough review to ensure all known eligible projects are included on each CoC’s FY 2017 GIW. The GIW calculates the Annual Renewal Amount (ARA) for each project, which is the total renewal amount a project may request under the FY 2017 CoC Program Competition, and the sum of all renewable budget line items (BLI) (e.g., rental assistance, leasing, supportive services). The sum of all individual project ARAs within the CoC is then used to calculate each CoC’s Estimated Annual Renewal Demand (ARD).

Important Notes:

  • SNAPS pre-populated the FY 2017 GIWs with all grants that are eligible for renewal funding within the CoC’s jurisdiction in the FY 2017 CoC Program Competition.
     
  • SNAPS used data from FY 2016 GIWS, Line of Credit Control System (LOCCS), and e-snaps to review the accuracy of the pre-populated project information.
     
  • The designated Collaborative Applicants for CoCs must review the projects on the posted GIWs and verify accuracy.
     
  • If a CoC identifies missing projects, projects that should be removed or projects with information that must be updated (e.g., BLI changes through a grant agreement amendment, grant consolidations approved by the local HUD CPD field office), the Collaborative Applicants must complete a GIW Change Form and submit it to the local HUD CPD field office for review.
     
  • Collaborative Applicants should only submit one GIW Change Form for all changes within that CoC.
     
  • All GIW Change Forms must be approved by the local HUD CPD Field Office. SNAPS will not consider any GIW Change Forms it receives directly from any CoC.

Important Dates:

  • The deadline for Collaborative Applicants to complete GIW reviews and submit GIW Change Forms to their local HUD CPD Field Office is Thursday, May 4, 2017. Local CPD field offices will not accept GIW Change Forms after May 4, 2017. Therefore, CoCs should not wait to send GIW Change Forms, but should begin their review and submit them early to allow their local CPD field offices time to review and approve or deny changes.
     
  • The local HUD CPD field offices will finalize GIW Change Forms received and provide the GIW Change Forms to SNAPS by May 12, 2017.
     
  • SNAPS will update GIWs based on the GIW Change Forms approved by the local CPD field office.
     
  • SNAPS intends to post all revised GIWs to the HUD Exchange no earlier than June 9, 2017.
     
  • SNAPS will send a listserv message to confirm completion of the FY 2017 GIW process.

Additional Resources

The following resources are available on the HUD Exchange:

Questions

If you have questions pertaining to e-snaps technical issues or the FY 2017 CoC Program Registration process, submit your questions to the e-snaps Ask A Question (AAQ) portal. To submit a question to the e-snaps AAQ portal, select “e-snaps” from the “My question is related to” dropdown list on Step 2 of the question submission process.
If you have questions related to the CoC Program interim rule or a policy related question, submit your questions to the CoC Program Ask A Question (AAQ) portal. To submit a question to the e-snaps AAQ portal, select “e-snaps” from the “My question is related to” dropdown list on Step 2 of the question submission process.
         
Visit the HUD Exchange at https://www.hudexchange.info

New Report on Chronic Illness and Depression in Youth



SAMHSA Logo

New Report Details the Association Between Chronic Illness and Depression in Youth

Today, SAMHSA debuts a new report on the association between a major depressive episode and chronic conditions such as diabetes, asthma, and obesity. The SAMHSA report is being released in recognition of National Children's Mental Health Awareness Day (Awareness Day). This year's Awareness Day theme, "Partnering for Help and Hope," focuses on the importance of integrating behavioral health and primary care for children, youth, and young adults with mental and/or substance use disorders. Along with the complete report, you can also access one-page "Spotlights" and accompanying infographics.
View the Report


[MARHMIS] MARHMIS Reboot!

Hi everyone,

We’re excited to get the MARHMIS group together again. You should have just received a calendar invite for this Monday with the following agenda:

AGENDA
<![if !supportLists]>1.      <![endif]>Agenda Overview & Introductions
<![if !supportLists]>2.      <![endif]>Recent HUD Updates
<![if !supportLists]>3.      <![endif]>Goals of MARHMIS TA Support
<![if !supportLists]>4.      <![endif]>Data Quality Presentation—Fran Ledger, Canavan Associates
<![if !supportLists]>5.      <![endif]>Open Discussion / Q&A
<![if !supportLists]>6.      <![endif]>Next Steps & Final Announcements

In this meeting, we will be giving a brief overview of the TA goals for building the group’s capacity, and will be following up via the listserv afterwards to solicit volunteers and gather further input from you all on how we can make this group the most useful for everyone. Below are some questions to begin thinking about:
  • What are the most helpful aspects of this group?
  • What discussion topics are the most important for everyone? What would folks like to see the general agenda look like?
  • Who is willing to join the agenda setting committee? How many do we need on this committee to keep it sustainable?
  • What other subcommittees might we need? (e.g. community speakers group to identify presenters)
  • What are some of the main roles and responsibilities of the group? (e.g. someone to: take notes, set agendas, coordinate speakers, send out meeting invites and reminders)
  • What is the best way to have communities volunteer to give peer presentations?
  • How far out should we plan our topics at a time?
  • How frequently should subcommittees and leadership meet?
  • What are the best ways to engage folks?
  • Should these meetings be via phone or in-person?

Please feel free to reach out to me at any time if you have any questions, concerns, or ideas.

Thanks!
Korrin

Korrin L. Bishop | Analyst | Social and Economic Policy Division
4550 Montgomery Avenue, Suite 800 North | Bethesda, MD 20814
O: 301.347.5759 | F: 301.634.1801 | www.abtassociates.com




This message may contain privileged and confidential information intended solely for the addressee. Please do not read, disseminate or copy it unless you are the intended recipient. If this message has been received in error, we kindly ask that you notify the sender immediately by return email and delete all copies of the message from your system.

[MARHMIS] MARHMIS Bi-Monthly Mtg.


We will be holding the MARHMIS Bi-Monthly meeting this Monday, 5/8, from 10am-12pm. We hope you can join us! Below, please find a brief agenda and call-in information. If you have any questions, please contact Korrin Bishop at korrin_bishop@abtassoc.com.

AGENDA
  1. Agenda Overview & Introductions
  2. Recent HUD Updates
  3. Goals of MARHMIS TA Support
  4. Data Quality Presentation—Fran Ledger, Canavan Associates
  5. Open Discussion / Q&A
  6. Next Steps & Final Announcements
Join our WebEx event:
Event address for attendees: https://abtassociates.webex.com/abtassociates/onstage/g.php?MTID=e2c2419ccc0963e743ac79518499b7f43
Event password: MARHMIS
-------------------------------------------------------
Audio conference information
(best if you join the meeting with above link BEFORE calling in)
-------------------------------------------------------
US Toll: +1-415-655-0002
Access code:
640 306 230


  ________________________________  
This message may contain privileged and confidential information intended solely for the addressee. Please do not read, disseminate or copy it unless you are the intended recipient. If this message has been received in error, we kindly ask that you notify the sender immediately by return email and delete all copies of the message from your system.

JOBS: HMIS Technical Assistant/Trainer (NJ)


Details HERE and below.



Description

NOTICE OF VACANCY
THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF THE NEW JERSEY HOUSING AND MORTGAGE FINANCE AGENCY INVITES APPLICATIONS FROM QUALIFIED CANDIDATES FOR THE FOLLOWING:
Job Title:HMIS Technical Assistant/TrainerIssue Date:4/7/17
Salary Range:(minimum starting salary $40,334)Closing Date:4/21/17 REPOSTED CLOSING DATE 5/19/2017
Division:HMISUnion Status:Professional
FL Status:ExemptEmployment Status:Full Time
JOB DESCRIPTION
Under supervision, participate in project development activities for the New Jersey Statewide Homeless Management Information System (HMIS) Collaborative, a statewide web-based information technology project; coordinate with the HMIS Project Manager and the HMIS technology vendor to provide services for the web-based system to homeless provider agency end users. Participate in the Statewide Advisory Committee meetings and other project related meetings as needed. Document HMIS implementation problems, issues and resolutions. Maintain and produce documentation pertaining to programming, system operation, and user documentation, identify security and confidentiality issues. Provide assistance to CoC organizations, including provider agency end users to support implementation of the HMFA New Jersey Statewide HMIS (Homeless Information Management System). Write and/or modify material for proposed training programs as required. Ensure quality training through the effective monitoring and assessment of the skills of end user agencies that have completed training programs. Assist with implementation of system that meets the HUD HMIS Technical standards and regulatory requirements. Prepare required reports and generate correspondence as required. Extensive travel is required.
MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS
EDUCATION/EXPERIENCE:
Two (2) year degree from an accredited college or university; three (3) years of work experience, preferrably with homeless service systems, planning bodies and HUD programs; or an equivalent combination of education and experience that meet the required knowledge, skills and abilities.
Certificates & Licenses Required
A valid driver's license in the State in which the person resides is required.
SKILLS:
Knowledge of HMFA program guidelines, statutes and regulations, HUD Continuum of Care planning process, HUD Homeless McKinney-Vento program funding regulations and requirements, HUD HMIS Technical Standards and regulations, Information Technology principles, practices and techniques, including web-based technology. The ability to apply complex regulations to varying situations, interact effectively with HMFA, State and local officials, homeless provider organizations, professional/technical groups and the general public. Must be computer literate, knowledge of Microsoft Word, Excel and related programs, able to communicate effectively orally, in writing, and to listen actively, prepare accurate, concise and informative reports. Be able to train on how-to-processes involved with Information Technology principles and application systems, enter and organize data in computer software, prioritize, plan, organize work and accomplish multiple assignments in a timely manner.Extensive travel is required.
BENEFITS
HMFA provides a comprehensive benefit program which includes the following: health, dental and prescription drug plans; vision care; deferred compensation plans; Public Employees' Retirement System (PERS); personal, sick and vacation days; tuition reimbursement and paid holidays. Residency in the State of New Jersey is required of all employees with an agency of the State in accordance with the New Jersey First Act, N.J.S.A. 52:14-7 (L. 2011, Chapter 70).
The NJHMFA is an Equal Opportunity Employer in compliance with all Federal, The NJHMFA is an Equal Opportunity Employer in compliance with all Federal, State and Local Regulations. NJHMFA provides equal employment opportunity to both individuals with veteran status and individuals with disabilities.