Deadline Today: Draft 2016 AHAR Data - All Persons and Veterans

Deadline Today: Draft 2016 AHAR Data - All Persons and Veterans
The deadline for submitting the draft Annual Homeless Assessment Report (AHAR) to Congress data for All Persons and Veterans is today, Monday, October 31, 2016. Communities that submit draft data by the deadline will be given priority for reviewing their data submissions and preparing for the final deadline on Thursday, December 1, 2016.
If you have any questions about the AHAR process, or have questions about the data submission requirements, you can reach out to your AHAR Data Liaison or consult the following 2016 AHAR guidance materials:
If additional questions arise that are not addressed by these resources, consult your assigned AHAR Data Liaison, or submit them online through the HDX Ask A Question (AAQ) portal on the HUD Exchange website. To submit a question to the HDX AAQ portal, select "HDX: Homelessness Data Exchange (including PIT, HIC, and AHAR)" from the “My question is related to” dropdown list on Step 2 of the question submission process.
         
Visit the HUD Exchange at https://www.hudexchange.info

News from the U.S. Interagency Council on Homelessness



Enhancing Access to Legal Services for Youth Experiencing Homelessness

Young man in library Youth experiencing homelessness have an oftentimes critical, but overlooked, need for legal services. Without them, youth may be unable to access or maintain housing, employment, health care, or other key services. 

Management and Program Analyst Mary Owens recently attended the Homeless Youth Law & Policy Summit and highlights some of the key strategies and recommendations for supporting the legal needs of youth experiencing homelessness.

Connecting Workforce, Housing Services for Families Experiencing Homelessness


Washington's Building Changes recently released a report of their work over the past decade to bridge workforce and housing services systems to assist families experiencing homelessness.
Helen Howell, executive director of Building Changes, shares what her organization has learned about making employment a critical element of rapid re-housing for families experiencing homelessness.
  

Council Discusses Sustaining Momentum, Planning for Incoming Administration

October 2016 USICH Council meeting USICH Chair and HHS Secretary Sylvia Mathews Burwell convened our third Council meeting of 2016 on October 18. Council members discussed the progress we've seen on ending homelessness across the country and efforts underway to make sure that momentum is sustained.

The Council invited three national organizations to share their perspectives on priorities for 2017 and also heard from four of the interagency working groups on efforts planned for 2017. Read the full update.
   

Rapid Re-Housing Works!

Rapid Re-Housing Works logo
The National Alliance to End Homelessness launched
Rapid Re-Housing Works, a campaign to help communities hone in on the core components of rapid re-housing and strengthen the intervention as a part of their coordinated response to homelessness.
Each week the Alliance will release new tools, articles, and resources, including videos, for you to use in your community. 


National Runaway Prevention Month logo

November is National Runaway Prevention Month, a time to raise awareness of the crisis of youth homelessness in this country. We all have a role to play in preventing and ending youth homelessness.




What's behind the healthcare rate hikes and 7 other things Donald won't tell you about the ACA

The Affordable Care Act recently made news for rate increases. Trump and the GOP are trying to use these increases as political weapons
One of the things he doesn’t tell you is that some of these increases could be attributed to the failure of the GOP to expand Medicaid. He also doesn’t tell you that he has no plans to fight rate increases. 
Without further ado, here’s more on this, and some of the other things he’s not telling you about the Affordable Care Act. 
1. Experts warned the states that if they didn’t expand Medicaid coverage, customers could see higher premiums. 
Why? Because hospitals tend to shift the costs of emergency room care to private insurers. In Nebraska in 2014, for example, hospitals provided uncompensated care to 54,000 people who would have qualified for coverage under Medicaid expansion. 
Adrian Sanchez, a spokeman for the Nebraska Hospital Association, said: 
As a result of Nebraska's failure to expand Medicaid, insured Nebraskans are likely to see an increase in health insurance premiums as they continue to cover the uncompensated healthcare costs of the uninsured. 
The Indiana Hospital Association similarly released a report saying individuals would see premiums drop by $241 and families by $691 if Indiana expanded Medicaid and extended coverage to 400,000 residents under the ACA. 
States that refused to expand Medicaid are almost all Republican-led states. 
2015 Medicaid expansion by state.
Where the states stand on Medicaid expansion. 
Business Insider says something similar: 
Many of the states seeing serious increases share similar traits: They have not expanded Medicaid, they have a low number of insurers active in the state, and they have larger rural populations, which are more expensive to cover.
This number includes 12.7 million who have purchased insurance in the marketplace. It also includes those who have gotten insurance through Medicaid expansion and young adults who were able to stay on their parents’ plan.
77 percent of people looking for plans in the marketplace can find a plan for less than $100/month with subsidies. More than 7 in 10 (72 percent) can find a plan for $75/month or less.
MIAMI, FL - NOVEMBER 02:  Martha Lucia (L)  sits with Rudy Figueroa, an insurance agent from Sunshine Life and Health Advisors, as she picks an insurance plan available in the third year of the Affordable Care Act at a store setup in the Mall of the Americas on November 2, 2015 in Miami, Florida. Open Enrollment began yesterday for people to sign up for a 2016 insurance plan through the Affordable Care Act.  (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
Martha Lucia (L) sits with Rudy Figueroa, an insurance agent from Sunshine Life and Health Advisors, as she picks an insurance plan at a store setup in the Mall of the Americas on November 2, 2015 in Miami, Florida. 
4. In the initial years of the plan, insurers may build in risk premiums
Once the ACA reforms have been in place and insurers understand the newly covered population, the market should stabilize and these risk premiums should disappear. 
In states that don’t expand Medicaid, however, risk premiums are more likely to persist due to continued uncertainty. 
Tax credits adjust to match changes in a benchmark plan. Here’s an example from the Department of Health and Human Services: 
A 27-year-old with an income of $25,000 a year will on average get a monthly tax credit of $160, a 62 percent increase compared to their tax credit in 2016. As a result, this consumer will pay $142 per month to purchase the benchmark plan in 2017, almost exactly the same as in 2016, when the consumer would have paid $143.
As tax credits adjust to match benchmark premiums, some people who weren’t eligible in 2016 may be eligible for tax credits in 2017. 
Of the 1.3 million people on the exchange who didn’t receive tax credits, it’s estimated that 22 percent could be newly eligible for credits in 2017. 
7. “Repeal and replace” means “Repeal” 
If Republicans wanted to fix the plan, they could easily pass legislative fixes. 
They don’t. 
So they propose that somehow the legislation has to be repealed first in order to be fixed. What they don’t tell you is that they know Congress is completely incapable of passing something new after it’s repealed. 
Repeal and replace = repeal. 
No matter what Donald or Republicans or anyone else for that matter tell you their replacement is, it won’t happen if the ACA is repealed. 
Coda
With the election two weeks away, there’s a lot of hysteria about a lot of things. Everything is being exaggerated to be terrible, horrible, and terribly horribly awful
Healthcare premiums have been rising for decades. This is likely going to continue to be a problem unless we do something. What we do know is that Republicans have no plans to fix it. They only have plans to repeal it. 
If we want to make things better, we should be fighting for a single payer plan: Medicare for everyone. 

David Akadjian is the author of The Little Book of Revolution: A Distributive Strategy for Democracy (ebook now available). 

New and Updated Resources Available for 2016 AHAR

The Annual Homeless Assessment Report (AHAR) Homeless Data Exchange (HDX) Error Guide is a new AHAR resource intended to help communities improve the quality of the data submitted for the AHAR and to offer transparency about the full list and description of errors embedded within the HDX. This guide outlines all of the validation errors embedded within the AHAR module in the HDX. It is a new addition to the existing guidance materials to assist communities through the AHAR data collection process. View the AHAR HDX Error Guide on the HUD Exchange.
In addition, the AHAR FAQ document has a few clarifications we made on the following topics: placement of transgender and other gender clients for both the length of stay questions and the household type questions, the treatment of Rapid Re-Housing (RRH) Demonstration projects for AHAR, how to indicate no veterans are served, and reporting the Summary category.
Remember that the draft deadline for submitting both the All Persons and Veterans data is Monday, October 31, 2016.
If you have any questions, consult your assigned AHAR Data Liaison, or submit them online through the HDX Ask A Question (AAQ) portal on the HUD Exchange website. To submit a question to the HDX AAQ portal, select “HDX: Homelessness Data Exchange (including PIT, HIC, and AHAR)” from the “My question is related to” dropdown list on Step 2 of the question submission process.
         
Visit the HUD Exchange at https://www.hudexchange.info

Register Now: Equal Access and Gender Identity Rules Training - November 2016

The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) is holding a series of webinars for Continuum of Care (CoC) Collaborative Applicants and providers, Emergency Solutions Grants (ESG) recipients and sub-recipients, and Housing Opportunities for Persons with Aids (HOPWA) grantees to educate participants about the requirements of the Equal Access Rule and Gender Identity Rule and how to ensure that projects operate in compliance with these rules. This webinar will also provide “LGBT Language 101” training to aid participants in increasing their knowledge and skills in using appropriate, inclusive language with all clients they serve. Participants will be introduced to HUD’s TA materials to aid their compliance efforts, including a self-assessment tool, staff and volunteer training scenarios, and a policies and procedures guidebook (all available on the HUD Exchange LGBT Resource page).

Webinar Dates

Date Time Registration
Monday, November 14, 2016 1:00-2:30 PM EST Register Now
Wednesday, November 16, 2016 2:00-3:30 PM EST Register Now
Thursday, November 17, 2016 1:00-2:30 PM EST Register Now
PLEASE NOTE: Registration is required. Click on the above session you wish to attend and click “Register Now” on the training page. Login to register or, if you are new to HUD Exchange Training and Events, click on “Create an Account” and then follow the instructions. Registrants should self-select the session they prefer to attend. Content will not vary across sessions.

Who Should Attend?

All programs funded under CoC, ESG, HOPWA, Community Development Block Grants (CDBG), the HOME Investment Partnerships Program (HOME) and the Housing Trust Fund (HTF) are required to follow the 2016 Gender Identity Rule as well as the continuing requirements of the HUD-wide 2012 Equal Access Rule. Together, these rules mandate placing and serving persons in accordance with their gender identity. A recent study indicated that less than 30% of emergency shelters appropriately enrolled transgender women in accordance with their gender identity. This training will focus on educating the funders and providers of residential projects so that transgender and LGBT participants are appropriately enrolled each time they present to a project or coordinated entry with a need for homeless housing and services.

Training Point of Contact

TJ Winfield | 240-582-3607 | EAR.Training@cloudburstgroup.com
To find out more information about upcoming trainings and access materials from previously held trainings, go to HUD Exchange Training and Events.
         
Visit the HUD Exchange at https://www.hudexchange.info

Bowman Systems NewsFlash: AHAR Fixes Applied



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10/27/2016

AHAR Fixes Applied

We have updated the AHAR report on all locally hosted ServicePoint sites that are on version 5.12.18 or greater. This update accounts for the 2016 leap year in the "Number of Nights" questions. Additionally, this update resolves an issue when running the AHAR for all clients where the veteran beds were not being considered for questions 2 and 4 (number of beds for participating and non-participating providers respectively).
Please contact your CSS if you have any questions.


www.bowmansystems.com

Monitoring for CPD Programs Page Now Available




Monitoring for CPD Programs Page Now Available
HUD is excited to announce the launch of the Community Planning and Development (CPD) Program Monitoring page on the HUD Exchange. The CPD Monitoring page provides information and resources to CPD grantees and CPD Field Office staff to assist in preparing for a HUD monitoring review, conducting a self-review, or monitoring subrecipients and other partners. Begin with the Monitoring Overview for key overarching guidance and then continue with each program and crosscutting requirement:


Homelessness Update




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spotlight on...
Is your program adhering to equal access and gender identity rules?
A recent study indicated that less than 30% of emergency shelters appropriately enrolled transgender women in accordance with their gender identity.

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development is hosting trainings on the Equal Access and Gender Identity Rule. The trainings (hosted Nov. 14, 16 and 17) will focus on educating funders and providers so that transgender and LGBT participants are appropriately enrolled each time they present to a project or coordinated entry with a need for homeless housing and services.
Read the announcement »
alliance events
Prepare for the 2017 youth PIT Count webinar
Wednesday, November 2, 2016, 2 p.m.
The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development has announced that 2017 will be the baseline year for using Point-in-Time data to track progress towards ending youth homelessness.

Is your community prepared? Join Applied Survey Research and Chapin Hall Voices of Youth Count as they discuss planning and implementation of effective youth counts.
Hud releases 2015 hmis data
The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development has released the 2015 Annual Homlessness Assessment Report (AHAR) Part 2, focusing on local Homeless Management Information Systems (HMIS) data.

The report paints a broad picture of homelessness and housing instability for all populations during the 2015 calendar year.
Read the report »
homelessness among women in LA increased 55% since 2013
The Downtown Women's Center of Los Angeles has released their 2016 Downtown Women’s Needs Assessment survey, confirming that this increase is largely a result of a lack of affordable, accessible housing for women.
Read the report »
report suggests extent of migration among vets may be exaggerated
A recently published study by the National Center on Homelessness Among Veterans shows that 15.3% of veterans migrated across regions while homeless, and more often earlier in episodes of homelessness.

There were no clear correlates to explain the dynamics of migration among this population, and fears about homeless veterans migrating to communities with great homeless systems are likely unfounded.
Read the brief »
from the blog
Ending Homelessness Today
the official blog of the national alliance to end homelessness
Get your rapid re-housing gears in sync!
by Kay Moshier McDivitt
It’s finally here. The phase of the Rapid Re-Housing Works campaign where we get to start talking about practice. For the next few weeks, our focus is going to be on the fundamentals of rapid re-housing, starting with today’s post on the core components – the gears, I like to say – of an effective homeless response system.
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This work is hard. It's boring. And, we're moving too damn slow.
by Guest Blogger, Kelly King Horne, Homeward (Richmond, VA)
The Alliance asked me to share why a gathering like the Rapid Re-Housing Leadership Summit matters. At Homeward, I talk about homelessness a lot and why data-driven collaboration matters, but today I want to share three reasons why pulling people from across the country together to think about taking rapid re-housing to scale, matters.
comments » | Like This work is hard. It's boring. And, we're moving too damn slow. on Facebook Google Plus One Button share on Twitter
Continuing a movement that's Built for Zero
by Jayme Day
Here are some things Steve Berg and Jayme Day learned at the Zarrow Mental Health Symposium.
comments » | Like Continuing a movement that's Built for Zero on Facebook Google Plus One Button share on Twitter

About Us

The National Alliance to End Homelessness is a nonpartisan, nonprofit organization dedicated to solving the problem of homelessness and preventing its continued growth.

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www.endhomelessness.org

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