Upcoming Webinar: New Tools and Guidance for Ending Veteran Homelessness





Join Us for an Upcoming Webinar!

New Tools and Guidance for Ending Veteran Homelessness

December 18, 2015, 1 PM EST

This webinar will provide updates from federal partners and will review recently released resources to assist communities with meeting the Federal Criteria and Benchmarks for ending homelessness among Veterans:  
The Federal Criteria and Benchmarks Review Tool can help communities understand their current status relative to each of the Federal criteria and benchmarks. The tool includes a criteria checklist, which breaks down each criterion into constituent aspects for stakeholder review, and a benchmark worksheet. 

The Master List Template and Benchmark Generation Tool includes a "by-name" Master List template that includes all data fields necessary to measure each of the four federal benchmarks, as well as other fields to support tracking, case conferencing, and rapid movement to permanent housing. The Benchmark Generation Tool uses data from the Master List template to automatically calculate the benchmarks. 

Panelists include:
  • Marcy Thompson, Senior Advisor, Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Special Needs, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development
  • Keith Harris, National Director of Clinical Operations, VHA Homeless Programs, U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs
  • Beverley Ebersold, Director of National Initiatives, U.S. Interagency Council on Homelessness
  • Tom Albanese, Senior Associate, Abt Associates
  • Doug Tetrault, Associate, Technical Assistance Collaborative

Participation Instructions:

Event number: 668 575 060
Event password: veteran
Audio conference: US Toll 1-650-3207
Audio conference access code: 668 575 060
The webinar is limited to 500 participants. If you are unable to participate in the webinar you can still view it at a later time.



Upcoming: Resources and Guidance for Ending Veterans Homelessness Webinar - December 18, 2015 - 1 PM EST


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U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development HUD Exchange Mailing List

Upcoming: Resources and Guidance for Ending Veterans Homelessness Webinar - December 18, 2015 - 1 PM EST


This webinar will provide updates from Federal partners and review recently released resources to assist communities with meeting the Federal Criteria and Benchmarks for ending homelessness among Veterans. The recently released resources include a Federal Criteria and Benchmarks Review Tool and a Master List Template and Benchmark Generation Tool.
  • The Federal Criteria and Benchmarks Review Tool can help communities understand their current status relative to each of the Federal criteria and benchmarks. The tool includes a criteria checklist, which breaks down each criterion into constituent aspects for stakeholder review, and a benchmark worksheet. An instruction tab is included and provides additional important clarifications, primarily concerning benchmarks A and B. The tool is designed to help identify remaining gaps to resolve prior to seeking Federal review.
     
  • The Master List Template and Benchmark Generation Tool includes a “by-name” Master List template that can be used as-is or be used to help communities identify data to include in a by-name, master list. The template includes all data fields necessary to measure each of the four Federal benchmarks, as well as other fields to support tracking, case conferencing, and rapid movement to permanent housing. The resource also includes Benchmark Generation Tool, which uses data from the Master List template to automatically calculate the benchmarks. An instruction tab is included that provides guidance for how to use the tools and programming logic for the benchmarks.
Panelists include:
  • Marcy Thompson, Senior Advisor, Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Special Needs, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development
  • Keith Harris, National Director of Clinical Operations, VHA Homeless Programs, U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs
  • Beverley Ebersold, Director of National Initiatives, United States Interagency Council on Homelessness
  • Tom Albanese, Senior Associate, Abt Associates
  • Doug Tetrault, Associate, Technical Assistance Collaborative

Participation Instructions:

The webinar is limited to 500 participants.
View the webinar address for attendees.
Event number: 668 575 060 | Event password: veteran
Audio conference: US Toll 1-650-3207 | Audio conference access code: 668 575 060
If you are unable to participate in the webinar you can still view it at a later time. The webinar will be recorded and available for future viewing on the HUD Exchange.


Guidance in Preparing for Potential Changes to GPD

Guidance in Preparing for Potential Changes to GPD
Good afternoon partners in service,
If your organization operates, works with, or is interested in pursuing Grant and Per Diem (GPD) funding, you may have heard of a pending “reboot” to the GPD program. This pending reboot and changes to the GPD program have been discussed in several venues, including at the NCHV Annual Conference and the NCHV Veterans Access to Housing Summit. For longstanding GPD providers, the uncertainty surrounding the reboot may cause worry and anxiety, and we want to help.
We at NCHV want to make sure you are fully informed as this process develops. In this letter, we will share what we know about pending changes to the program and help you prepare for the reboot. If you are prepared, you can make the application or reapplication process more seamless and increase your chances of continuing to provide GPD services.
First, you should know that very little is publicly known about how the program will shift. The following are our best guesses, and none of what follows is official or guaranteed. These are things to think about to prepare for the likely reboot. Like all Federal grant notices, we will not know exactly what changes will be made until the grant notice is published in the Federal Register. What we do know is that a reboot is highly likely to happen, soon, and will likely require existing GPD programs to reapply for funding.
We can assume a few facts about the application process:
  1. Who can apply? The reboot could mean that both Per Diem Only (PDO) and organizations that received Grant funding will need to reapply. This could include Special Needs Grant and TIP grantees as well. New programs – those without GPD currently – may also be eligible to apply. It is likely that existing GPD grantees, especially those with Grant funding, will receive some sort of prioritization or additional points in the scoring process. Existing GPD providers may be able to combine several PDOs or multiple existing awards into one application for your organization or community.
  2. How will the application process happen? VA will publish the funding notice through the Federal Register and NCHV and our partners will make sure this information is quickly shared with you. You will likely have anywhere between 30 and 90 days to submit an application.
  3. How long will the awards be? Awards may range from one-year grants, to one-year grants with optional renewal years based on performance, to multi-year awards. We can expect that the funding notice will outline in more detail the measurement criteria for continued funding.
Looking at recent trends in programs and language, we can make a few assumptions about the content of the application. Possible focus areas could include:
  1. Tracked approach to services: You are likely to see reference to a tiered or tracked approach to GPD services to serve a spectrum of veterans needing GPD services, from those needing a short-term stay to those interested in a longer term, more intensive approach to care. This could include terms like “bridge housing” and “long-term service intensive” to match language used by the Federal benchmarks (learn more about those here).
  2. Documenting process for lowered barriers to entry: A key feature of recent efforts to integrate Housing First principles into the GPD program is lowering barriers to entry. A new application may require that you document how your agency implements Housing First principles, including lowered barriers to entry.
  3. Documenting GPD in your community’s housing continuum: Recent widespread efforts to build integrated local community systems may translate to the GPD application by a requirement or suggestion that your GPD be part of the local community planning effort. This could include your process for documenting current and future need for transitional housing within your community’s spectrum of housing programs available to veterans in need. Where it exists, GPD is a critical component of this housing spectrum for veterans, especially those who do not qualify for or want HUD-VASH or who need immediate support while working with SSVF to obtain permanent housing; you should expect the application to require this bigger picture look at your housing continuum.   
  4. Showcasing connection to the CoC and SSVF: Again, efforts to propel local coordination will likely show up in any new GPD funding application. This could include requiring or suggesting inclusion in a coordinated intake system (if one exists), regular engagement with your local SSVF grantees, and inclusion in or engagement with the CoC. It may also describe the importance of inputting data into HMIS.
  5. Documenting client choice: Recent emphasis on the importance of client choice, specifically during informed conversations about available housing interventions to lead to permanent housing, may filter into the GPD application. The application may require applicants to showcase how they document this informed choice process with veterans referred to or from GPD, and also how the regular case management process facilitates the most successful and rapid movement to permanent housing for each veteran.
  6. A focus on placement outcomes, to include HUD-VASH placement: You can expect a new application to focus on the importance of a move to permanent housing for veterans going through GPD, to include documenting placement in HUD-VASH, general PSH, and independent housing. You know that some veterans will be in GPD for a short period of time, while others may stay in for a longer period based on their own choice; no matter their length of stay, all of these veterans will likely need a plan for sustainable housing placement.
Based on these assumptions, you can start a few processes to prepare for a pending reboot:
  1. Update your Scope of Work to match your services: if your organization already offers tiered or tracked services, or if you already differentiate between short-term and long-term pathways for veterans in GPD, you will want to update your Scope of Work to reflect the services you are already providing. Making these updates now will enable you to document your history of service through GPD in terms quantifiable according to recent trends.
  2. Connect to your CoC and know your community need: If your agency is already engaged closely with your CoC and community planning effort, you are on the right track. Look to the SSVF program for an example of VA grantees formalizing the relationship with their CoC through an MOU. Note that this process can take some time, so you may want to start now. In the next CoC program cycle, some CoCs may have fewer Transitional Housing resources… now is a good time to reach out to see how your GPD can fill transitional housing needs for veterans who may have been served through the CoC in your community.
  3. Know where your program currently stands: Leading into the reboot, your organization should look closely at the restrictions and opportunities in front of you. For example, if your agency decides to move away from transitional housing to instead pursue alternate funding for permanent housing with your current facilities, you will need to know if your GPD received Grant funding (i.e. not a PDO), when you received Grant funding, and how much Grant funding you received to assess how logistically and financially feasible it would be for you to make the switch. Generally, if you are a PDO GPD, your process for discontinuing GPD services is markedly easier than if your organization received a significant Grant within the last few years. You can contact the GPD office to find out more about your options.
  4. Look at your outcomes: This may be a good opportunity to focus in on your high housing placement rates, your relationships with landlords in your community, your placement rates into units within the general rental market, and your ability to help veterans to increase their income to support their own housing stability. Take a look at your outcomes and how results are quantified.
Let us know what you need from the program: The GPD program will shift with the reboot, but we know that the program is limited in how much change can occur due to restrictions in the current law. NCHV is working hard to develop recommendations from the community to best meet local needs. Have ideas? Contact Joshua Stewart at jstewart@nchv.org

HUD Releases New Webcasts for the AFFH Training Series


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U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development HUD Exchange Mailing List

HUD Releases New Webcasts for the AFFH Training Series


HUD releases two webcasts for the affirmatively furthering fair housing (AFFH) training series: AFFH Community Participation Requirements for Consolidated Plan Program Participants Webcast; and AFFH Community Participation Requirements for Public Housing Agencies Webcast.

AFFH Community Participation Requirements for Consolidated Plan Program Participants Webcast

This webcast, published December 11, 2015, provides an overview of affirmatively furthering fair housing (AFFH). Participants will learn:
  • Community participation requirements for Consolidated Plan Program Participants under the new AFFH rule
  • How to achieve meaningful actions
AFFH Community Participation Requirements for Consolidated Plan Program Participants Webcast
View the AFFH Community Participation Requirements for Consolidated Plan Program Participants Webcast.

AFFH Community Participation Requirements for Public Housing Agencies Webcast

This webcast, published December 11, 2015, provides an overview of affirmatively furthering fair housing (AFFH). Participants will learn:
  • Community participation requirements for Public Housing Agencies under the new AFFH rule
  • How to achieve meaningful actions
AFFH Community Participation Requirements for Public Housing Agencies Webcast
View the AFFH Community Participation Requirements for Public Housing Agencies Webcast.

View Related Materials

The AFFH New Rule Page contains the latest news and resources about the rule.

Get Credit

To add this webcast to your learner transcript, watch the webcast and select the Get Credit button. Note, you need a HUD Exchange Account to add this training to your learner transcript.

To find out more information about upcoming webinars and access materials from previously held webinars, go to the HUD Exchange Training & Events page.


Reminder: Final Deadline for 2015 AHAR Data - All Persons and Veterans - Wednesday, December 23, 2015


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U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development HUD Exchange Mailing List

Reminder: Final Deadline for 2015 AHAR Data - All Persons and Veterans - Wednesday, December 23, 2015


The deadline for submitting the final Annual Homeless Assessment Report (AHAR) data for All Persons and Veterans is Wednesday, December 23, 2015.
If you have any questions about the AHAR process, data submission requirements, or are having issues with your vendor or HMIS software, please reach out to your AHAR Data Liaison or consult the following updated 2015 AHAR guidance materials.
If additional questions arise, you can submit them online through the HDX Ask A Question (AAQ) portal on the HUD Exchange website. To submit a question to the HDX AAQ portal, select "HDX: Homelessness Data Exchange (including PIT, HIC, and AHAR)" from the “My question is related to” drop down list on Step 2 of the question submission process.


SNAPS In Focus: Recovery Housing


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U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development HUD Exchange Mailing List

SNAPS In Focus: Recovery Housing


Last week, we released a brief that we at HUD have been discussing and working on for some time on the topic of Recovery Housing. I am excited about the opportunity to share with you our thoughts on how Recovery Housing programs should be structured, how they fit into the Continuum of Care (CoC), and how Recovery Housing programs can offer meaningful choices for people with substance use disorders.
Many CoCs have programs funded through the CoC Program that serve people experiencing homelessness who also have substance use disorders. In fact, HUD funds about 1,600 projects across the country that serve this population – more than 600 of which serve this population exclusively. This is a significant part of our portfolio, and we want to be sure that programs provide the highest quality housing and services using the most promising practices. In that spirit, we started looking into program models that would point us in the right direction. Some projects use a Housing First and harm reduction model, some are treatment-oriented transitional housing programs, others refer to themselves as “sober-living environments,” while others refer to themselves as “Recovery Housing.” The focus of the policy brief is the model referred to as Recovery Housing – which the brief also defines.
As you will see in the brief, and in the guest blog by Ed Blackburn from Central City Concern – a highly respected agency in this field – Recovery Housing is a model that is intended for people whose preference is to live in a recovery-oriented environment. While this might not be the appropriate or preferred option for everyone with a substance use disorder, it is important that CoCs provide a range of housing and service options for people experiencing homelessness. At its core, Recovery Housing is a peer-supported model that a participant self-initiates, and that is low barrier in all ways except the requirement that the participant is committed to recovery. Entry into the program is not predicated on a set amount of clean time, strict income requirements, background checks, or other barriers. It is not only low barrier in terms of entry into the program, but maintains that value by ensuring that relapse does not necessarily mean eviction from the program.
Although it is low barrier, the Recovery Housing model does require a personal commitment to sober living. This can make it difficult for Recovery Housing programs to find an appropriate place at the table in CoCs that have adopted a CoC-wide Housing First orientation. But I would argue that Recovery Housing and Housing First as concepts are not at odds and have much more in common than not. In both cases, people experiencing homelessness have a choice as to how and where they live and receive services. In both cases, it is the self-determination of the program participant to choose the type of program in which they want to reside. CoCs should allow for meaningful and low-barrier options based on the needs and preferences of those who present for assistance.
There are a variety of program design models for serving persons with substance use disorders. CoCs should carefully review all programs within their geographic area that serve this population to determine if any of the available programs use a Recovery Housing model. If not, I would urge you to consider whether a Recovery Housing program would benefit persons in your CoC, and whether even small changes to existing program designs to make projects align with the Recovery Housing model would result in better options for those seeking these housing/service options.
As always, thank you for all the work you do serving people experiencing homelessness – especially those who are struggling with substance use disorders. If you have questions about the Recovery Housing brief, please submit them through the Ask A Question (AAQ) portal on the HUD Exchange website.
Ann Oliva
Deputy Assistant Secretary for Special Needs

Download this SNAPS In Focus Message: Recovery Housing
View SNAPS In Focus Messages


Out of Prison, Into Public Housing!




www.shelterforce.org
Tuesday, December 15, 2015


 

Events

Webinar: Investing in Community Change | December 17, 2015
This webinar, based on an article in the current issue of The Foundation Review, describes how the revitalization focus of the Wells Fargo Regional Foundation's grantmaking process is designed to make neighborhoods more attractive for large-scale investment. View full info and register here.

Cities Building Community Wealth | CUNY School of Law | January 29, 2016
In this free event, CUNY School of Law, the Democracy Collaborative and Surdna Foundation will highlight the work of innovative city leaders working to build more inclusive, equitable, and cooperative economies, and discuss how municipal policy can be best used to build community wealth. See list of speakers and register here.

Resources


The Ford Foundation recently hosted RIGHTS NOW: Reimagining Justice in the 21st Century. Videos of the day are available for viewing, and include conversations with Representative John Lewis, former Attorney General Eric Holder, and more. See videos here.

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Remembering Debby Visser
On December 4, we lost a good friend, thoughtful colleague, and champion for social justice in Debby Visser. Debby's career in community and economic development spanned decades. She was most recently director of NeighborWorks' Success Measures Partnerships, an independent shop that supports NeighborWorks network organizations and other nonprofit partners by providing them with tools to evaluate the success of their programs and strategies.

Read below for some thoughts and memories about Debby from former colleagues, as well as us here at ShelterforceMore 


Build? Don't Build? Both Wrong

Jamaal Green, Portland State University    
It is hardly a progressive, or even a classically liberal, position to limit the ability of folks to move to places where they can find greater opportunity. At the same time, supply side advocates need to be . . .  More 


Out of Prison, Into Public Housing!
Doug Ryan, CFED
With sentencing reforms, about 6,000 federal prisoners will see an early release in the next year or so. Where will they live?  More 


Can San Francisco Get Mixed-Income Public Housing Right?
Mark L. Joseph, Nancy L. Latham,
Rachel Garshick Kleit, and Steven L. LaFrance

File under: Finally! The San Francisco public housing redevelopment project known as HOPE SF sets the goal we've been waiting for: 100 percent right to return. How are they doing?  More 


NY Times Misses Point on DC Gentrification
Derek Hyra, Dominic Moulden, and Gregory Squires

A Times Real Estate piece misleads their readers as they discuss how one DC neighborhood has been rebranded to attract young urbanites. Here's what the Times missed . . .  More 


Radioactive Waste + Underground Fire . . . What Could Go Wrong?
Laura Barrett, Center for Health, Environment and Justice

A smoldering fire in a mismanaged landfill is less than 1,000 feet away from a radioactive waste dump in Bridgeton, Missouri. Experts predict that the fire could . . . More 

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You Said It!

"You all do great work! The Weekly blog is consistently helpful and timely. Shelterforce stands out as a first rate publication in a rapidly evolving field. Thank you!" --Prudence Brown

"It surprises me that there's such push back against permanently affordable housing since working people's ability to access housing in the private market continues to decline. Permanently affordable housing seems to me to be the most efficient use of taxpayer dollars; why isn't the tea party demanding it?" --Anne Gass on Have We Been Wasting Affordable Housing Money?
"As the late Dorothy Richardson once said, the only thing that will truly eliminate the issues affecting communities is the full integration of them. I believe she meant full integration not only by so-called race, but by economic status, etc." --Thomas Roberts on Anchoring "The Community" to the Community Building Movement


"In my years in non-profit human service management I cannot count the times I've seen a municipal government, properly concerned with an identified problem, use city resources to try to address the problem without first checking in with the local non-profit community. In the end, both municipal governments and non-profit agencies are both answerable to the public, and should work together to meet local needs whenever possible." --David Gibb, more . . .

"To me this story shows how the synergy between nonprofits and local governments--which Salamon identified as a defining feature of the U.S. social services system--is still being rediscovered and put to use today." --Susan Freis Falknor, more . . .
Author Reply
"My content area is homelessness, which at this point in time is a very fluid area of collective work. THE HEARTH Act requires far more community- and data-driven decision processes than ever before . . . A LOT goes into reshaping a service delivery system but if structural deficiencies are overcome or greater impact is truly realized, then it is worth it." --Judy Perlman, more . . .

The Answer




Q:
Do inclusionary housing requirements make housing prices go up for everyone else?


A: No, they do not.

Market-rate developers are business people. They charge as much as the market will bear. When housing prices go up, they charge more; when housing prices go down, they ask less. Developers are "price-takers" not "price-setters" because they only control a tiny share of the housing market. A large majority of rental and for-sale housing is located in existing buildings, not in brand-new buildings, limiting the influence of new housing, and inclusionary requirements, on home prices.

The Answer is for you to use. You can download a PDF to print here


Looking for a Job?

Editorial Position


President and Chief Executive Officer National Low Income Housing Coalition 

The National Low Income Housing Coalition is a Washington, D.C.-based nonprofit organization dedicated solely to achieving socially just public policy that assures people with the lowest incomes in the United States have affordable and decent homes. Founded in 1974 by Cushing N. Dolbeare, NLIHC educates, organizes and advocates to ensure decent, affordable housing for everyone. NLIHC's goals are . . .
Read Full Listing 

Shelterforce magazine, the voice of community development, is seeking a sharp, organized, detail-oriented, flexible, cause-driven person to join our small editorial staff. We are a 40-year-old nonprofit that publishes both online and in print, serving practitioners working in the fields of affordable housing, community development and reinvestment, community organizing, community planning, creative placemaking, progressive urban planning, community economic development, racial and economic equity and justice, and related fields and movements . . . Read Full Listing


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In This Issue


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Featured Bloggers
Center for Health, Environment & Justice

Housing Assistance Council

Michael Bodaken
National Housing Trust

Raphael Bostic
USC Price School of Public Policy

Janis Bowdler
JPMorgan Chase & Co.

HOPE Credit Union

Burlington Associates

Democracy Collaborative

Tufts University

Jamaal Green
Portland State University

Fund for Public Schools

Lisa Hodges
Hodges Development, LLC

Planner, Louisa County, Va.

National CAPACD

Rick Jacobus
Street Level Advisors

Opportunity Agenda

CFED

National Housing Institute

Alexandra Moffett-Bateau
City University of New York

Tulane University

Habitat for Humanity

National Urban League

CFED

ACLU Maryland

Center on Budget and Policy Priorities  

San Francisco Community 
Land Trust

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Shelterforce Weekly

Associate Editor, Keli Tianga


Publisher, Harold Simon 

Assistant Publisher, Terri L. Clegg