Webinar – Providing Reasonable Accommodations to Employees with Disabilities

Webinar – Providing Reasonable Accommodations to Employees with Disabilities
Thursday, July 16, 2015 at 2:00 p.m. EDT
The NCHV NVTAC is hosting the webinar "Providing Reasonable Accomodations to Employees with Disabilities" on Thursday, July 16, 2015 at 2:00 p.m. EDT. Job accommodations are important for the successful employment of individuals with disabilities, but for those with traumatic brain injury and mental health impairments such as post-traumatic stress disorder, accommodations are essential. Knowing how, when and why it might be necessary to disclose a disability is the first and often most difficult part of the accommodation process.
This webcast will provide information on the disclosure of disabilities in the workplace and common accommodations that might be needed. Real-life accommodation situations and solutions will be interspersed throughout the session. Melanie Whetzel from the Job Accommodations Network (JAN) will be leading the discussion.
TO REGISTER FOR “Providing Reasonable Accommodations to Employees with Disabilities
Please send the following information to conferencecalls@nchv.org:
First Name:
Last Name:
Email Address:
Organization:
Organization Address:
What webinar are you registering for?
Does you organization have an HVRP grant?
You will receive instructions for joining the training and a link to the training materials when you register. For additional questions, please contact Antonio Addessi at aaddessi@nchv.org or call us at 202-546-1969.

Upcoming: Housing First for People Experiencing SMI and Co-Occurring Mental Health and Substance Use Disorders Webinar - July 9, 2015 - 3 PM EDT


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U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development HUD Exchange Mailing List

Upcoming: Housing First for People Experiencing Serious Mental Illness (SMI) and Co-Occurring Mental Health and Substance Use Disorders Webinar - July 9, 2015 - 3 PM EDT


Date: Thursday, July 9, 2015
Time: 3:00-4:30 PM EDT
Hosted By: The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)
Housing First is an effective intervention that ends and prevents homelessness for individuals with severe mental illness and co-occurring mental health and substance use disorders. By providing permanent, independent housing without prerequisites for sobriety and treatment, and by offering support services through consumer-driven Assertive Community Treatment teams, Housing First removes some of the major obstacles to obtaining and maintaining housing for consumers who are chronically homeless. This webinar will provide practical information about implementing the Housing First model to serve people experiencing Serious Mental Illness (SMI) or co-occurring disorders. Join the webinar to hear real life experience in implementation, learn tips and strategies for putting the theory into practice.

Presenters

Sam Tsemberis
Dr. Sam Tsemberis is sometimes called the “father” of Housing First. Dr. Tsemberis founded Pathways to Housing in 1992, based on the belief that housing is a basic human right. Pathways developed the consumer-driven Housing First model, which provides immediate access to permanent supportive housing for people coming out of homelessness and who have mental health and addiction problems. In addition to serving as a lead trainer within Pathways' Housing First Institute, Dr. Tsemberis is on the faculty of the Department of Psychiatry at Columbia University Medical Center. He is currently participating in national studies of homelessness, mental illness, and addiction, and has published numerous articles and book chapters on these topics, including the Housing First manual (Hazelden Press, 2010).

Daniel Malone
Daniel Malone has recently stepped in as the Executive Director of DESC in Seattle, Washington, a homelessness service organization providing survival and crisis services, behavioral health services, and permanent supportive housing. Daniel has been at DESC more than 25 years, first providing direct client services and later becoming the organization's first Housing Director and then Deputy Director. A major emphasis of Daniel's work has been designing, implementing, and evaluating programs for chronically homeless people with serious mental illness and addiction problems.

Ann V. Denton, M.Ed., Moderator
Ann Denton is the Director of SAMHSA’s Homeless and Housing Resource Network (HHRN). In that capacity, she is currently leading the effort to update SAMHSA’s Permanent Supportive Housing Toolkit. Ms. Denton is a subject matter expert on effective systems and interventions for persons with mental illness, substance abuse, and co-occurring disorders. She develops training products, leads training teams and provides training and technical assistance to states and communities in many areas, including housing development, funding and implementation of evidence-based practices, permanent supportive housing, services and supports for people with disabilities, and access to mainstream services. Ms. Denton’s field experience includes programs for persons with substance abuse, mental illness and co-occurring disorders.

Do you have questions you’d like to have answered on the webinar? Please send them to Jannah Umar (jumar@ahpnet.com).
Space is limited. Reserve your webinar seat now.
After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

System Requirements

PC-based attendees
Required: Windows® 8, 7, Vista, XP, or 2003 Server

Mac®-based attendees
Required: Mac OS® X 10.6 or newer

Mobile attendees
Required: iPhone®, iPad®, Android™ phone, or Android tablet


Federal Policy and Advocacy Update Webinar




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Federal Policy and Advocacy Update Webinar  
In preparation for the 2015 Capitol Hill Day, in conjunction with the National Conference on Ending Homelessness, the Alliance's policy team is hosting a webinar on the policy priorities driving the Capitol Hill Day agenda. Staff will review these policy priorities and provide the latest legislative and political updates to ensure that Capitol Hill Day participants and other interested advocates have the newest information prior to their Hill visits. While targeted toward State Captains and those participating in Capitol Hill Day, this webinar will offer an opportunity for anyone who is interested to learn more about where things stand in the federal budget process for key homelessness and affordable housing programs. Join us on July 9 at 12:00 pm ET for the webinar. 
Register for the webinar!
Capitol Hill Day 2015
As the National Conference on Ending Homelessness approaches, the Alliance is preparing attendees from around the country for Capitol Hill Day 2015, taking place on July 17. Capitol Hill Day is a day-long advocacy effort during which participants meet with their respective Members of Conference to discuss the state of homelessness in their state or district and urge them to take specific action with regards to homelessness programs.

Capitol Hill Day is an excellent opportunity to interact with your Representatives and Senators, participate in the political process, and make your voice heard! Last year's Capitol Hill Day saw over 235 advocates attend 200 meetings which resulted in more funding for homeless programs. Members of Congress work for the interests of their constituents and, therefore, have personal and professional stake in your concerns. The Alliance expects this year's Capitol Hill Day to be one of the most effective yet and hopes that anyone who is passionate about ending homelessness in America will join us in our effort.

For more information about Capitol Hill Day 2015, please contact Jeanna Gover at jgover@naeh.org.  
Capitol Hill Day 2015 












For Homeless Families, Quick Exit From Shelters Is Only A Temporary Fix : NPR

Jordan McClellan gets help making lunch from daughter Kyra Brooks in their apartment in Southeast Washington, D.C. McClellan has been fighting homelessness for most of her adult life, living in family shelters and transitional housing until she was moved into the rapid rehousing program.

Jordan McClellan gets help making lunch from daughter Kyra Brooks in their apartment in Southeast Washington, D.C. McClellan has been fighting homelessness for most of her adult life, living in family shelters and transitional housing until she was moved into the rapid rehousing program.
Lexey Swall/GRAIN for NPR

More than 150,000 U.S. families are homeless each year. The number has been going down, in part because of a program known as rapid rehousing, which quickly moves families out of shelters and into homes.
But new research by the Obama administration finds that for many families, rapid rehousing is only a temporary fix.
It seemed like a good idea back in 2009 — when the recession had pushed thousands of families into homelessness. Rather than stay in shelters, families would get rental assistance for a few months — maybe a year — until they could get back on their feet.
"What rapid rehousing did is say from the moment a family walks in, how can we get you out of here as quickly as possible and back into a home of your own," says Jennifer Ho, a senior adviser on housing and services at the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.
As part of the Economic Recovery Act, Congress approved about $1.5 billion for the program, making it a key tool for reducing family homelessness.
But Ho says new research by HUD has raised some red flags.
"Rapid rehousing is not a magic solution," she says.
Her agency has found that families that get rapid rehousing are just as likely later on to face the same housing problems as families that stay in shelters: Many of them end up returning to a homeless shelter, doubling up with family and friends or moving from place to place.
Jordan McClellan, a single mother of three in Washington, D.C., knows this all too well. She's gone from program to program, never getting far from the brink of homelessness.
"There have been many days where I just wanted to give up," she says. "I felt nobody heard me, nobody cared."
Kyra Brooks, 8, strokes her mother's head. After years in and out of various programs, McClellan finally received a permanent housing voucher for the apartment she and her three children live in now. That means she has to pay up to 30 percent of her income in rent, but there's no time limit, unlike in the rapid rehousing program.
Kyra Brooks, 8, strokes her mother's head. After years in and out of various programs, McClellan finally received a permanent housing voucher for the apartment she and her three children live in now. That means she has to pay up to 30 percent of her income in rent, but there's no time limit, unlike in the rapid rehousing program.
Lexey Swall/GRAIN for NPR
It began eight years ago when McClellan had two small children and was pregnant with her third. She lost her telemarketing job and was evicted from her apartment.
As many families do, she went to live with a parent, but that didn't work out. So she moved into a homeless shelter for a year, then transitional housing where her rent was subsidized. When she got a job as a medical assistant, her subsidy went down.
"And literally, the month that my rent went up, I lost my job," says McClellan.
But the rent stayed high for several more months, leaving her in debt and facing eviction.
Then McClellan was told she was moving to a new program called rapid rehousing. She became eligible for more rental aid, but it would last only a year. Then she'd be on her own.
"The way the program is set up, every four months, your rent goes up 10 percent to get you by the end of that year in a place where you can pay the full market rent," McClellan says. "And mind you, market rent at my unit was $1,700."
The assumption was that at the end of the program, McClellan would have a job. But instead, she had hip surgery and was unable to work. She says she was told she could get a three-month extension, "but that extension was contingent upon me having surgery on my other leg."
McClellan knew the additional surgery would make it more difficult to get a job and be able to afford her own place.
McClellan plays the card game UNO with her kids and their friend in the Southeast Washington, D.C., apartment the family moved into in March.
McClellan plays the card game UNO with her kids and their friend in the Southeast Washington, D.C., apartment the family moved into in March.
Lexey Swall/GRAIN for NPR
So McClellan sought help from the Washington Legal Clinic for the Homeless, where Marta Beresin is a staff attorney. Beresin says rapid rehousing is intended for families who face a short-term crisis, not those like McClellan who have a whole host of problems. For some of Beresin's clients, rapid rehousing became more like rapid revolving door.
"Oftentimes, families who had been doing everything they could to increase their income, and be able to afford the rent in their unit, but just weren't there yet, and they were being cut off, they're being evicted and they were coming back into shelter," the attorney says.
Laura Zeilinger, Washington, D.C.'s new director of human services, says some of the complaints about the program are legitimate. In the past, she says, the city sometimes used rapid rehousing in a punitive way, as a stick to motivate families to get work, even though they clearly needed more help.
She's trying to change that, Zeilinger says, "to really support families differently, to say we really believe in your potential to be able to make it in the long run and we are here with you to support you in doing so."
This includes providing other services, such as job training and education, that people need to be able to afford their own place.
But Zeilinger defends rapid rehousing. She says it's been a big success for many families and that it's more stable and less expensive than putting a family up in a shelter. HUD estimates that costs about $60,000 per family, per year.
She and others in the field take issue with some of HUD's findings, noting that the study looks at only 12 communities, over a limited time period. And, Zeilinger says, there are few alternatives. Ho, of HUD, agrees that the goal is to improve rapid rehousing, not to replace it.
McClellan stands on her balcony, watching her kids play. "I have a roof over my head," she says. "Now I can focus on getting a job and ... moving forward in life."
McClellan stands on her balcony, watching her kids play. "I have a roof over my head," she says. "Now I can focus on getting a job and ... moving forward in life."
Lexey Swall/GRAIN for NPR
In Jordan McClellan's case, things are looking up. She has just landed what almost everyone, including HUD, agrees is the best way to help homeless families. She has received a permanent housing voucher and in March was able to use it to get a new apartment. She has to pay up to 30 percent of her income in rent, but there's no time limit, so she finally has some stability.
"You know it's a sense of security, like OK, I have a roof over my head, now I can focus on everything else," McClellan says. "Now I can focus on getting a job and, you know, moving forward in life."
But the waiting lists for such vouchers are years, even decades long, in communities across the country. And no one expects Congress to fund more anytime soon, which is another reason rapid rehousing, and how it works, are getting a closer look.