HUD Guidance on HMIS Data Collection for Runaway and Homeless Youth (RHY) Programs


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U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development HUD Exchange Mailing List

HUD Guidance on HMIS Data Collection for Runaway and Homeless Youth (RHY) Programs


HUD has learned that Continuums of Care (CoCs) have implemented requirements prohibiting data entry for persons served in Runaway and Homeless Youth (RHY) programs without written consent. This is a barrier to integrating RHY programs into Homeless Management Information Systems (HMIS). HUD is sending this guidance to strongly encourage communities to relax restrictions for agencies serving youth. HUD expects all CoCs and HMIS Lead Agencies to support the integration of RHY programs in HMIS by removing any consent requirements that local CoCs have implemented beyond the minimum set by HUD in the 2004 Notice.
HMIS Data and Technical Standards of 2004 establish minimum client consent requirements, stating:
“A [Covered Homeless Organization] CHO may collect PPI only when appropriate to the purposes for which the information is obtained or when required by law…” “…A CHO must post a Privacy Notice at each intake or comparable location that explains generally the reasons for collecting required HMIS data.”
Provisions at 45 CFR 1351.20 of the Runaway and Homeless Youth Act state:
“Grantees will also be required to submit statistical reports profiling the clients served. The statistical reporting requirements are mandated by the Act which states that ‘runaway and homeless youth projects shall keep adequate statistical records profiling the children and families which it serves…’ ”
Although HUD is expecting communities to remove the stricter requirements for youth programs, HUD is not expecting CoCs change their requirement for any other programs using their HMIS at this time. HUD expects CoCs to involve all youth programs–including RHY providers–in their community planning processes in addition to integrating them into the CoC’s HMIS.
HUD and its federal partners recognize the distinction between data collection and data sharing and the challenges communities experience in interpreting federal requirements. The Family and Youth Services Bureau (FYSB) and HUD are working on further guidance on both data collection and data sharing and will release it in the near future. HUD is drafting an HMIS Privacy and Security Notice that will provide additional information and clarify requirements.
Please direct questions regarding this guidance to the HUD Exchange Ask A Question (AAQ) portal. To submit a question to the AAQ portal, select “HMIS: Homeless Management Information Systems” from the “My question is related to” drop down list on Step 2 of the question submission process.


HUD Publishes FY 2015 CoC Program Registration FAQs 


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U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development HUD Exchange Mailing List

HUD Publishes FY 2015 CoC Program Registration FAQs


New e-snaps Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) are now available on the HUD Exchange. The new FAQs provide guidance on commonly asked questions regarding Continuum of Care (CoC) Program Registration for the FY 2015 CoC Program Competition.
View the FAQs on the e-snaps FAQs page.
FAQ topics addressed include:
  • Process and Requirements
     
  • Importing
     
  • Submitting Registration to HUD
     
  • CoC Review
If you have a question that is not answered by the existing FAQs, please submit your question through the HUD Exchange Ask a Question (AAQ) portal. To do this, please select e-snaps from the "My question is related to" drop down list on Step 2 of the question submission process.
To learn more information about the FY 2015 CoC Program Registration, view the FY 2015 Continuum of Care (CoC) Program Competition: Funding Availability page. The FY 2015 CoC Program Registration opened April 28, 2015 and will close on May 18, 2015 at 7:59:59 PM EDT.


Utah's Strategy for the Homeless: Give Them Homes - NBC News.com

Utah's Strategy for the Homeless: Give Them Homes

By the end of 2015, the chronically homeless population of Utah may be virtually gone. And the secret is quite simple:
Give homes to the homeless.
"We call it housing first, employment second," said Lloyd Pendleton, director of Utah's Homeless Task Force.
Even Pendleton used to think trying to eradicate homelessness using such an approach was a foolish idea.
"I said: 'You guys must be smoking something. This is totally unrealistic,'" Pendleton said.
But the results are hard to dispute.
In 2005, Utah was home to 1,932 chronically homeless. By April 2015, there were only 178 — a 91 percent drop statewide.
"It's a philosophical shift in how we go about it," Pendleton said. "You put them in housing first ... and then help them begin to deal with the issues that caused them to be homeless."
Chronically homeless persons — those living on the streets for more than a year, or for four times in three years, and have a debilitating condition — make up 10 percent of Utah's homeless population but take up more than 50 percent of the state's resources for the homeless.
The Homeless Task Force reported it costs Utah $19,208 on average per year to care for a chronically homeless person, including related health and jail costs. Pendleton found that to house and provide a case worker for the same person costs the state about $7,800.
'They're part of our citizenry. They're not them and us. It's "we."'
"It's more humane, and it's cheaper," Pendleton said. "I call them 'homeless citizens.' They're part of our citizenry. They're not them and us. It's 'we.'"
For six years, Suzi Wright and her sons, DJ and Brian, shuttled among friend's homes, a van and the Salt Lake City homeless shelter.
After Utah gave Wright a two-bedroom, two-bathroom apartment, she got a job as a cleaning supervisor at her apartment complex.
"It makes you feel a lot better about yourself, just being able to support your family," Wright said.
Those given apartments under the Housing First program pay rent of 30 percent of their income or $50, whichever is greater.
Army veteran Don Williams had been sleeping under a bush for 10 years when Utah offered him an apartment.
When he realized they weren't joking, he "jumped for joy," he said, laughing. "It was a blessing. A real blessing."