Important Information Regarding the FY 2014 CoC Registration: CoC Review Step in e-snaps


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U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development HUD Exchange Mailing List

Important Information Regarding the FY 2014 CoC Registration: CoC Review Step in e-snaps


HUD is completing its review of each CoC’s registration for the FY 2014 portion of the FY 2013 – FY 2014 CoC Program Competition in e-snaps. Collaborative Applicants must now go back into e-snaps to review HUD’s determination by 5:00 PM your local time on Thursday August 29, 2014. Please note if your CoC Review is not available immediately, please check back within a day or so. As HUD completes its review of the CoC Registrations, you will then have visibility for your CoC Review.
Collaborative Applicants must log back into e-snaps and go to “CoC Review” step on the “Submission” page to access HUD’s assessment.

Collaborative Applicants must ensure that “Yes” or “Not Applicable” is appearing in the drop-down boxes of the following forms in e-snaps:
  • 1A. Approved CoC Type Designation: 4. Does the CoC agree with the approved CoC Designation?
     
  • 2B. CoC Geographic Areas: 3. Does the CoC agree with the HUD-approved geographic area(s)?
     
  • 3C. CoC Maximum Funding Needs: 2. Does the CoC agree with the total ARD? AND 3. Does the CoC agree with the total CoC merged need amount?
If the Collaborative Applicant answers “No” to any question, it must enter a comment in order for HUD to appropriately address in its FINAL DETERMINATION.
If the CoC disputes any part of the CoC Review, HUD will review one last time and consider the CoCs proposed changes. HUD will then notify the Collaborative Applicant via e-mail that a final determination has been made. The Collaborative Applicant will then go back into e-snaps to access the CoC Review step again and select “Submit.” All disputes must be resolved and approved by 5:00 PM your local time on Thursday, August 29, 2014. A Collaborative Applicant has only one opportunity to dispute. If the Collaborative Applicant disagrees with HUD’s assessment the 2nd time, they will receive a final rejection notice and will not have access to the FY 2014 CoC Application.
The e-snaps instructional guide, CoC Registration Instructional Guide: CoC Registration and CoC Review, includes step-by-step instructions for completing the CoC Review process in e-snaps beginning on page 50.
All Collaborative Applicants should review the following:
  1. CoC claimed geography – in most cases there are no changes
     
  2. Preliminary Pro Rata Need (PPRN) – the amount is based on the geographic area(s) selected

  3. Annual Renewal Demand (ARD) – in some cases the ARD amount may have been changed by HUD. If this is the case, and you have NOT received a copy of your HUD-approved Grant Inventory Worksheet (GIW) to review, please contact your local HUD field office immediately

  4. Merger Status – in most cases there are no changes

  5. CoC Planning – this amount may have changed if the CoC was in ARD status and the ARD amount changed. Remember, the CoC planning amount is determined by the CoC’s PPRN or ARD, whichever is higher AND is calculated at 1.25 percent or $250,000, whichever is less
If the CoC disputes any part of the CoC Review, HUD will review one last time and consider the CoC's proposed changes. HUD will then notify the Collaborative Applicant via e-mail that a final determination has been made. The Collaborative Applicant will then go back into e-snaps to access the CoC Review step again and select “Submit”. All disputes must be resolved and approved by Thursday, August 28, 2014 by 5:00 pm, your local time. A Collaborative Applicant has only one opportunity to dispute. If the Collaborative Applicant disagrees with HUD’s assessment the second time, they will receive a final rejection notice and will not have access to the FY 2014 CoC Application.

Confirm Information in Applicant Profile

This step can be completed between now and the FY 2014 CoC Program Competition process. Prior to the opening of the FY 2014 CoC Program Competition, Collaborative Applicants need to review their CoC Applicant Profile in e-snaps to confirm the following:
  1. Collaborative Applicant Name in the CoC Applicant Profile MATCHES the Collaborative Applicant Name listed on the CoC Registration AND the Grant Inventory Worksheet.

  2. The Primary Contact and/or Alternate Contact listed are associated with the Collaborative Applicant Name listed – at least one of the names must match and both persons MUST be authorized by the CoC and Collaborative Applicant to submit the CoC Consolidated Application (i.e., CoC Application, CoC Project Listing, and Project Applications) AND are authorized to enter into a written agreement with HUD.

  3. The Collaborative Applicant is a legal entity; non-profit, State, instrumentality of local government, or Public Housing Agency. These are the ONLY entities who are authorized to submit the CoC Consolidated Application. Additionally, the proper legal document must be attached; therefore, if the Collaborative Applicant is a non-profit, a copy of the non-profit documentation (e.g., copy of the 501(c)(3)) must be attached.
The Updating the Applicant Profile Resource includes step-by-step instructions for updating the Applicant Profile in e-snaps.
Any Collaborative Applicant that fails to submit its final CoC Registration by 5:00 pm, your local time on Thursday, August 28, 2014, will NOT be able to apply for funds in the FY 2014 CoC Program Competition. Only CoCs that successfully submitted the final CoC review to HUD will be able to access the FY 2014 CoC Priority Listing, which means that CoCs who have not successfully submitted CoC Registration will be unable to rank project applications for new reallocated projects, renewal projects, CoC Planning projects, and Unified Funding Agency (UFA) costs, if applicable.

Questions?

If you have questions pertaining to e-snaps technical issues or CoC Review, please submit your questions to the e-snaps Ask A Question (AAQ) portal. To submit a question to the e-snaps AAQ portal, select “e-snaps” from the “My question is related to” drop down list on Step 2 of the question submission process.
If you have questions related to the CoC Program Interim Rule or a policy related question, please submit your questions to the CoC Program Ask A Question (AAQ) portal. To submit a question to the CoC Program AAQ portal, select “CoC Program” from the “My question is related to” drop down list on Step 2 of the question submission process.


Register Today: Basically CDBG for Entitlement Grantees


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U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development HUD Exchange Mailing List

Register Today:
Basically CDBG for Entitlement Grantees


The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) is pleased to announce a series of Basically CDBG for Entitlement Grantees. This training provides answers to common CDBG questions and highlights HUD's interpretation of key policy issues.
Participants will learn :
  • CDBG National Objectives & Eligible Activities
  • Program Administration & Financial Management
  • IDIS Performance Measurement & Reporting/Recordkeeping
This 3-day training includes a combination of lecture and hands-on in-class exercises.

Who Should Attend?

This training is intended for all CDBG Entitlement grantees.
Indianapolis, IN
September 9-11, 2014
Richmond, VA
September 30- October 2, 2014
Jacksonville, FL
October 28-30, 2014
Save the Date
For more information and to view other training locations, visit the Basically CDBG for Entitlement Grantees Training Module News page.
Instructions on how to register are available in the HUD Exchange Learn User Guide.

Additional Information

Note: Your enrollment in the class does not guarantee confirmation. You will receive confirmation email entitled “Confirmation Basically CDBG” once your enrollment has been approved.

Travel Arrangements

Note: Do not make any non-refundable travel arrangements until you receive an email confirmation notice. HUD cannot be responsible for penalties incurred due to cancelled arrangements.


Fwd: Registration Open for Sept. 10 Webinar | Family Connection: Tailored Interventions and Assistance



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USICH and HUD Will Host the Second of Four Webinars on Family Homelessness September 10, 2014

 
Join us on September 10, 2014, for a webinar titled Family Connection: Tailored Interventions and Assistance. This is the second informational webinar in a series on building systems to end family homelessness. The webinar will feature best practices and lessons learned from two community partners, as well as policy insights from HUD and USICH.
Millions of extremely low-income households do not have access to affordable housing, which puts them at risk for housing instability and the types of crises that can result in homelessness. In 2013, 222,197 people in families—an estimated 70,960 households—were experiencing homelessness on a single night in January.
To end family homelessness, community systems must be in place to connect families to services and supports that are tailored to the unique needs of everyone in the household.  This webinar is intended to provide communities and stakeholders with information on how to use a range of resources and program models—which includes rapid re-housing, permanent supportive housing, affordable housing and transitional housing—to better serve families.
Community Partners:
Katie Kitchin, Community Alliance for the Homeless, Memphis, TN
Gwen McQueeney, Northern Virginia Family Service, Manassas, VA
Federal Partners:
Todd Shenk, HUD
Lindsay Knotts, USICH
Space is limited. Register now.
https://www4.gotomeeting.com/register/271649799
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The USICH Solutions Database is a searchable source of proven programs that help to end homelessness.
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Retooling the Homeless Crisis Response System


United States Interagency Council on Homelessness - No on should experience homelessness. No one should be without a safe, stable place to call home.
Retooling the Homeless Crisis Response System




August 21, 2014


Retooling the Homeless Crisis Response System is Critical to Ending and Preventing Homelessness
In this video, Laura Green Zeilinger talks about what it means to end homelessness and how we can retool community systems to better respond to the crisis of homelessness. 

Responding to the Crisis of Homelessness
A Message from Laura Green Zeilinger, USICH Executive Director


We write and talk a lot about homelessness as a social problem and what we know about the solutions.  We are compelled to take on this very complex problem because we see the people who are affected.  In a recently released  90-second video, Rethink Homelessness helped millions of viewers look past the label of "homeless" and see people.

At an individual level, the turmoil that comes from not having a safe place that is home is a crisis.  It is a crisis that without adequate resolution gets worse.  Although there are programs that provide housing and services for people, we will never have an adequate response at the pace and scale needed as long as it depends on people in crisis being required to navigate multiple programs in an attempt to get their needs met.  Responding in a person-centered way to homelessness requires that programs are operating as a system.  Making this shift is not simple, but it is being done in more and more communities throughout the country, and a systems approach is essential to achieving an end to homelessness.

Ending homelessness means providing a pathway to stable and permanent housing now for people who are experiencing homelessness. It also means changing the way we respond when people have a housing crisis so that we can prevent homelessness whenever possible or otherwise ensure that homelessness is a rare, brief, and nonrecurring experience.  We do this by helping individuals and families keep or quickly transition back to permanent housing with access to needed services.  This response is what in Opening Doors: Federal Strategic Plan to Prevent and End Homelessness we call the "homeless crisis response system." It is the overall system where coordinated assessment, homeless programs, and mainstream programs logically fit together to provide a meaningful solution for people.

With true coordination and collaboration, homeless providers and mainstream systems can work together to create a seamless response that does not expect people to navigate multiple programs in an effort to get their needs met. Instead, communities can create a system that:

√    is easily accessible and known throughout the community
√    is equipped to reach out to people as necessary
√    assesses the needs of all members of a household
√    provides service and support options based on what people want and need
√    connects people with shelter or housing and service supports without barriers to entry

 Building this system requires that all stakeholders in a community work together. You are a part of the system. Understand your value. Understand where you or your program fits in, where your seat at the table is, and invite others whose involvement you need. System-level transformation is not easy nor will it happen overnight; but it can happen and is happening in communities across the country. Together you will build the crisis response system necessary for achieving an end to homelessness in your community. 
 



Retooling the Homeless Crisis Response System - In Depth

Communities shift approaches, re-orient programs and services to end homelessness instead of only managing the problem.


Historically, people experiencing homelessness have had to navigate an uncoordinated set of services and programs to obtain assistance, with many of the available programs and services oriented towards managing the symptoms or experience of homelessness rather than providing rapid connections to stable and permanent housing that would end homelessness.  Often, permanent housing was only offered at the end of a linear process or the achievement of particular services milestones. This resulted in many individuals and families remaining in homelessness, when--for any number of reasons--they could not achieve the high barrier to entry into permanent housing.

Over the past several years however, many communities have shifted their approach, providing services that are focused on ending, not managing homelessness. Communities are retooling the homeless crisis response system to coordinate services and reorient programs to a Housing First approach that emphasizes rapid connection to permanent housing, while mitigating the negative experience of homelessness.

Along with being easily accessible and well-known throughout the community, a crisis response system must be able to outreach effectively, provide meaningful and safe emergency services, as well as a rapid pathway to permanent housing with needed services for households at-risk of or experiencing homelessness.

Follow the link a more in depth look into what makes an effective homeless crisis response system. 


 



Register for Our Sept. 10 Family Connection Webinar

family connection webinar september 10 2014 HUD USICH

 
Join USICH and HUD on September 10, 2014, for a webinar titled
Family Connection: Tailored Interventions and Assistance. This is the second informational webinar in a series on building systems to end family homelessness.
Millions of extremely low-income households do not have access to affordable housing, which puts them at-risk for housing instability and the types of crises that can result in homelessness.As a result,  the 2013 Point-In-Time Count found 222,197 people in families-an estimated 70,960 households-experiencing homelessness on a single night in January.

In order to end family homelessness, community systems must be in place to connect families and their children to interventions and assistance that are tailored to the unique needs of everyone in the household. This webinar is intended to provide communities and stakeholders with information on how to utilize a range of resources and program models to better serve families, including rapid re-housing, permanent supportive housing, affordable housing, and transitional housing. 
 

Featured Presenters: 
Katie Kitchin, Community Alliance for the Homeless, Memphis, TN
Gwen McQueeney, Northern Virginia Family Service, Manassas, VA
Todd Shenk, HUD
Lindsay Knotts, USICH


 
Space is limited. Register now!



News from Our Partners


The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) issues notice on prioritizing persons experiencing chronic homelessness in permanent supportive housing and record keeping requirements for chronic homeless status.

The Family & Youth Services Bureau within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Administration for Children & Families
publishes its Report to Congress on the Runaway and Homeless Youth Program for fiscal years 2012 and 2013. The report chronicles the successes of grantees in delivering services, such as housing and shelter, emergency care and counseling, to youth without a safe and stable place to call home.

The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) announces $300 Million in grants under the Supportive Services for Veteran Families (SSVF) program, which will serve approximately 115,000 Veterans and their families experiencing or at-risk of homelessness. 
HUD's Community Development Block Grant program celebrates 40 years of providing decent affordable housing and services to the most vulnerable in our communities, as well creating jobs through the expansion and retention of businesses. Learn more about #CDBGturns40 

 

The Office of Early Childhood Development within the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services Administration for Children & Families published Promising Practices for Children Experiencing Homelessness: A Look at Two States. The resource examines the effects of homelessness on young children,
Federal initiatives that expanded access to early care and learning for young children experiencing homelessness, and efforts in Massachusetts and Oregon to implement innovative policies to improve early childhood outcomes for young children experiencing homelessness.


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MAYORS CHALLENGE TRACKER
181 mayors, 6 governors, and 13 county officials have committed to end homelessness among Veterans in their communities by the end of 2015.


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What Works: 
Coordinated Assessment


Investing in proven solutions is a key premise of Opening Doors. The commitment to end homelessness compels all of us to focus resources and efforts on solutions that work, while encouraging well-designed innovations for continuous improvement. Here we offer entries from the USICH Solutions Database that provide you with case studies of how various communities achieve coordinated assessment. 


YWCA Family Center and Coordinated Point of Access
Columbus, OH
Bellingham, WA
Massachusetts





Inspired by People: New Report Offers Alternatives to Criminalization
in the public eye report on alternatives to criminalization of homelessness

Without housing options, people often are forced to rely on culverts, public parks, streets, and abandoned buildings as places to sleep and carry out daily activities that most reserve for the privacy of their own home. As communities recognize and struggle with the fact that people without homes often live in public spaces, multiple strategies arise. Unfortunately, many of these strategies include policies that criminalize homelessness. In a new report, In the Public Eye, author Lucy Adams, of Australia's Justice Connect and guest blogger at USICH elevates the conversation. 

  



In Case You Missed It

2014 National Conference on Ending Homelessness Materials Available
First Lady Michelle Obama's appearance at the 2014 Homelessness Conference

Videos of the full speeches made by First Lady Michelle Obama, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Secretary Juli├ín Castro, along with session presentation materials, from the 2014 National Conference on Ending Homelessness are now available for viewing.  





Health Begins at Home Webinar Video Available for Download

Richard Cho, USICH Senior Policy Director, recently moderated a SAMHSA/HRSA webinar with titled "Health Begins at Home: Integrating Primary and Behavioral Care Services and Housing to End Homelessness." The 90-minute session covered opportunities created by the Affordable Care Act to integrate housing and health care. 

Click here to download video. (Email required.)


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