[MARHMIS] Recordings of today's presentations

Afternoon MARHMIS members:

First of all, I’d like to apologize - I neglected to record the entire meeting (I’m going to blame it on it being Monday); however, I did record the presentations from David Weathington and Kat Freeman, which was the bulk of our meeting today. Good stuff!

Anyway, click this link for the recording: https://copa.webex.com/copa/lsr.php?RCID=4ddd63c578808932a6622abcdc611ec6 – if you are prompted to run a plug-in click “run” or “allow.”

I’ve also attached the slides for your reference. Thanks again, David and Kat!

Also, I think I may have mis-explained my notes during our discussion of the new information about translating the forthcoming tweaks to the new project type data element. Just to be clear, I’m going to state the info I have again.

<![if !supportLists]>1)      <![endif]>HUD will be allowing/ requiring (I’m unsure which) SSO projects to reclassify to fit the CoC program components during the upcoming GIW process (HUD will be providing CoCs guidance on this during that process).
<![if !supportLists]>2)      <![endif]>For us as HMIS administrators, this could affect how an SSO project is classified under the HMIS data element 2.6 – Project Type. To address this, the project type data element will be tweaked to have two dependencies:
<![if !supportLists]>a.       <![endif]>If a project is “services only,” we’ll need to record if a project is Affiliated with a residential project (yes or no)
<![if !supportLists]>b.      <![endif]>If yes, the project ID(s) of the residential project(s) associated need to be recorded

So, this means (some of this will be a bit obvious, sorry if that’s the case):
<![if !supportLists]>1)      <![endif]>A services only project providing street outreach must be typed as “street outreach.” A project providing street outreach AND a direct service component serving persons other than “street homeless” must be typed as two separate projects; one for street outreach, and the other for one of the options below.
<![if !supportLists]>2)      <![endif]>A project that provides only services (other than outreach), has associated housing outcomes, and is restricted by grant agreement to serve only those clients in one or more specific residential projects, must be typed as “Services only” and the dependency for Affiliated with a residential project must be set to “yes.” Each associated project ID must be identified.
<![if !supportLists]>3)      <![endif]>A project that provides only services (other than outreach), has associated housing outcomes, and is not restricted by grant agreement to serve only those clients in one or more specific residential projects, must be typed as “Services only” and the dependency for Affiliated with a residential project must be set to “no.”
<![if !supportLists]>4)      <![endif]>A project that provides only services (other than outreach) that are “stand alone supportive services” with no associated housing outcomes should be typed as “other” (ongoing case management is not included here, that would fall under “services only”). This is where we’d stick projects that are funded to provide child care, dental services, etc. to homeless persons

I hope that explains it a little better than I did verbally. If anyone needs me to hit my notes a little harder, let me know.

Have a great day!

Daniel Fox | Economic Development Analyst 2 & PA HMIS System Administrator
PA Department of Community & Economic Development
Center for Community Financing,  Technical Support & Program Development Division
Commonwealth Keystone Building
400 North Street, 4th Floor | Harrisburg, PA 17120-0225
Phone: 717.720.7412 |  daniefox@pa.gov | ra-pahmis@pa.gov
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[MARHMIS] RE: Vulnerability Index Tools for Coordinated Assessment/ Centralized Intake

Hi David,

Your Way Home Montgomery County launched its centralized intake process in January 2014. We just completed a lot of six-month reporting, so we have a good amount of data and lessons learned to share. To answer your questions:

<![if !supportLists]>·         <![endif]>What kind of tool is your community using (Vendor developed and/or Community developed)?
<![if !supportLists]>1.       <![endif]>We are using the SPDAT (Service Prioritization and Decision Assistance Tool) to prioritize for housing services. We have had some successes and some challenges as a result of its implementation that I’d be happy to go over in more detail.
<![if !supportLists]>2.       <![endif]>We have found that we need to add questions regarding housing status on top of this assessment, but we don’t include it in the score. Originally we had recorded data on the housing status using the HUD categories but we’ve found that it isn’t detailed enough for future services planning. So, we are moving to an assessment that asks questions regarding specific locations, as well as questions around immediate safety, child welfare, or overcrowding, or how long the person could stay if needed.

<![if !supportLists]>·         <![endif]>How many questions are used for assessment? (Is longer or short better; How detailed)
<![if !supportLists]>1.       <![endif]>We had been using the full version of the SPDAT, which is 60 questions and takes about 1- 1.5 hours to complete. This was done via an in-person assessment after the family arrived in shelter. We are now switching over to conducting the SPDAT pre-screen (a shortened version) over the phone or in-person at the shelter, which takes about 15 minutes.
<![if !supportLists]>2.       <![endif]>We use a street outreach component along with the Call Center to verify street homelessness. We’ve also found that the Call Center data usually has to be verified again, since it is all based on self-report, so we are going with a shortened assessment at the call center to merely direct the call to the shelter or Housing Resource Center that can then assess the client in more detail. Our Call Center assessment is going to be very focused on determining how long a person can safely stay at their current residence.

<![if !supportLists]>·         <![endif]>How is the tool delivered? (Outreach Team, Call Center, Housing Provider)
<![if !supportLists]>1.       <![endif]>Call Center, in conjunction with on-the-ground support from the outreach team and our Housing Resource Centers (community locations that do the full SPDAT and provide RRH).

<![if !supportLists]>·         <![endif]>How is your community prioritizing client referrals to Emergency Shelter, Transitional Housing, Rapid Re-Housing, Permanent Housing, Supportive Service Providers, etc.?
<![if !supportLists]>1.       <![endif]>Shelter- we had used the SPDAT to prioritize for shelter, but have found that that isn’t ideal. We are now working on revising our shelter prioritization by just using location/ safety, and not using the SPDAT score for prioritization until they are in shelter or at a diversion site.
<![if !supportLists]>2.       <![endif]>RRH and PSH are prioritized based on severity of score within the component. We don’t have any PSH openings, though, so that throws a chink in the works as we try to get more beds for that population. Right now we are re-housing that population and then switching funding over to a Behavioral Health/ Adult and Aging or other long-term source as they become available.

<![if !supportLists]>·         <![endif]>How is your community using the data collected through the triage tool to make funding decisions or community interaction?
<![if !supportLists]>1.       <![endif]>The great thing about the SPDAT is that is provides a really nice visual for what your population looks like, from a vulnerability standpoint. The reports attached are:
<![if !supportLists]>1.       <![endif]>SPDAT scores of families and individuals from the first 6 months of coordinated entry. The colors correlate to acuity and housing intervention: Red is No assistance, Blue is appropriate for Rapid Re-Housing, the Green for PSH. This was part of a longer report that hasn’t been publically released yet; I’ll share when it is.
<![if !supportLists]>2.       <![endif]>All of our SPDAT data so far; specifically, a breakdown of component scores (wellness, socialization, risks, trauma). This is going to be used to inform which supportive services we need to beef up but wasn’t our first priority for addressing.
<![if !supportLists]>2.       <![endif]>The other big takeaway is that our data showed that 85% of families and 40% of individuals were coming from doubled-up situations, so we are currently working on developing and funding diversion and prevention services specifically for that population. Coupled with the SPDAT data showing that most households are medium acuity, we are able to evidence the need for prevention and/or diversion funding, especially to our philanthropic partners, who really appreciated having this kind of information broken down by acuity.
<![if !supportLists]>3.       <![endif]>The tool has been helpful as a communication device with providers, as well. Anecdotally we were hearing one story from providers, but when we looked at the overall SPDAT data, we were able to show that something else was going on. This actually led to really good conversations around the kind of support services needed and the common problems the providers were facing, and provided a common language for us to use with providers that encompassed some very complex situations. It also helped us pinpoint issues that had otherwise been difficult to define.

The SPDAT is definitely a new way of providing services, and you have to implement it within the larger context of the “SPDAT philosophy,” otherwise it will just cause other problems (lesson learned number 1). We do have some questions about the “evidence” that supports that it is more accurate than other models, since OrgCode hasn’t released that report to the public yet. Over the next six months we are probably going to continue to revise our use of it and the centralized intake/ prioritization process as a whole.

Hope that helps.
Emma


Emma Weisser
Clarity Program Manager
County of Montgomery Department of Housing and Community Development
PO Box 311
Norristown, PA 19404
610-278-3827



From: marhmis@googlegroups.com [mailto:marhmis@googlegroups.com] On Behalf Of Weathington, David A.
Sent: Monday, July 14, 2014 11:18 AM
To: 'marhmis@googlegroups.com'
Subject: [MARHMIS] Vulnerability Index Tools for Coordinated Assessment/ Centralized Intake

Good Morning All,

Here in Chester County, Pennsylvania we have been operating under a Coordinated Assessment model for a little over a year and are interested in putting together a vulnerability tool to use in our system. We have been reviewing several vulnerability indexes throughout the nation and were wondering who in the MARHMIS community is using a vulnerability index or self sufficiency assessment tool and how the continuum is using the data to refer individuals and families to services and housing in the community.

Below you will find bullet points of what we would like to find out about the tools your community is using currently.

<![if !supportLists]>·         <![endif]>What kind of tool is your community using (Vendor developed and/or Community developed)?
<![if !supportLists]>·         <![endif]>How many questions are used for assessment? (Is longer or short better; How detailed)
<![if !supportLists]>·         <![endif]>How is the tool delivered? (Outreach Team, Call Center, Housing Provider)
<![if !supportLists]>·         <![endif]>How is your community prioritizing client referrals to Emergency Shelter, Transitional Housing, Rapid Re-Housing, Permanent Housing, Supportive Service Providers, etc.?
<![if !supportLists]>·         <![endif]>How is your community using the data collected through the triage tool to make funding decisions or community interaction?

If anyone has anything else they would like to share about their community we would greatly appreciate any information.

Thank you in advance,

David A. Weathington
CCCIMS Program Coordinator
Chester County Department of Community Development
601 Westtown Road, Suite 365
West Chester,PA 19380
610-344-5411

“I am fundamentally an optimist. Whether that comes from nature or nurture, I cannot say. Part of being optimistic is keeping one’s head pointed toward the sun, one’s feet moving forward. There were many dark moments when my faith in humanity was sorely tested, but I would not and could not give myself up to despair. That way lays defeat and death.”
-Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela

[MARHMIS] Vulnerability Index Tools for Coordinated Assessment/ Centralized Intake

Good Morning All,

Here in Chester County, Pennsylvania we have been operating under a Coordinated Assessment model for a little over a year and are interested in putting together a vulnerability tool to use in our system. We have been reviewing several vulnerability indexes throughout the nation and were wondering who in the MARHMIS community is using a vulnerability index or self sufficiency assessment tool and how the continuum is using the data to refer individuals and families to services and housing in the community.

Below you will find bullet points of what we would like to find out about the tools your community is using currently.

<![if !supportLists]>·         <![endif]>What kind of tool is your community using (Vendor developed and/or Community developed)?
<![if !supportLists]>·         <![endif]>How many questions are used for assessment? (Is longer or short better; How detailed)
<![if !supportLists]>·         <![endif]>How is the tool delivered? (Outreach Team, Call Center, Housing Provider)
<![if !supportLists]>·         <![endif]>How is your community prioritizing client referrals to Emergency Shelter, Transitional Housing, Rapid Re-Housing, Permanent Housing, Supportive Service Providers, etc.?
<![if !supportLists]>·         <![endif]>How is your community using the data collected through the triage tool to make funding decisions or community interaction?

If anyone has anything else they would like to share about their community we would greatly appreciate any information.

Thank you in advance,

David A. Weathington
CCCIMS Program Coordinator
Chester County Department of Community Development
601 Westtown Road, Suite 365
West Chester,PA 19380
610-344-5411

“I am fundamentally an optimist. Whether that comes from nature or nurture, I cannot say. Part of being optimistic is keeping one’s head pointed toward the sun, one’s feet moving forward. There were many dark moments when my faith in humanity was sorely tested, but I would not and could not give myself up to despair. That way lays defeat and death.”
-Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela



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SOAR Learning Community Call #3: Supporting Quality Applications


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July 11, 2014

SOAR Learning Community Call #3

Supporting Quality Applications

Tuesday, July 22, 2014
3:00-4:30pm EDT

Register Now!


SOAR TA Center staff will offer successful models for quality review of SOAR assisted SSI/SSDI applications from around the country including use of the Application Review Rubric, MSR review, case review meetings, outcomes reports and the SOAR TA Center Liaisons. A guided activity will be completed to practice/review quality review skills.
This call is intended for individuals who actively work on SOAR assisted SSI/SSDI applications or those who support or supervise SOAR trained case workers.
The SOAR Learning Community Call Series focuses on the administrative aspects of running a SOAR program. The first two calls can be accessed on our website at http://soarworks.prainc.com/article/soar-learning-community-call-series:
March 18: Creating and Leading Steering Committees/Conducting Effective Meetings
May 20: Funding & Sustainability

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Register Today: Basically CDBG for State Grantees


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Developing Viable Communities through Housing, Services, & Economic Opportunities

Register Today:
Basically CDBG for State Grantees


The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) is pleased to announce the Basically CDBG Training for State Grantees. This training provides answers to common CDBG questions and highlights HUD's interpretation of key policy issues.
Participants will learn :
  • CDBG National Objectives & Eligible Activities
  • Program Administration & Financial Management
  • IDIS Performance Measurement & Reporting/Recordkeeping
This 3-day training includes a combination of lecture and hands-on in-class exercises.

Who Should Attend?

This training is intended for all CDBG State grantees.
Boston, MA
August 19-21, 2014
For more information and to view other training locations, visit the Basically CDBG for State Grantees Training Module News page.
Instructions on how to register are available in the OneCPD Learn User Guide.

Additional Information

Note: Your enrollment in the class does not guarantee confirmation. You will receive confirmation email entitled “Confirmation Basically CDBG for State Grantees” once your enrollment has been approved.

Travel Arrangements

Note: Do not make any non-refundable travel arrangements until you receive an email confirmation notice. HUD cannot be responsible for penalties incurred due to cancelled arrangements.


[MARHMIS] Westchester County RFP for HMIS Administrator

MARHMIS members,

In order to assist Westchester County in ensuring that the CoC Partnership meets HUD’s requirements, the County is seeking consulting services for the operation, management, and coordination of the County’s HMIS.  The vendor that ultimately provides these services will commonly be referred to as the “HMIS Administrator.” As part of the Services, the HMIS Administrator will be responsible for managing and coordinating the ongoing support, training, reporting and project management needs of the HMIS based upon the requirements of HUD, the CoC Partnership’s compliance with HUD’s requirements, and the HMIS-related services the County requires for other appropriate programs serving the homeless.

Requests for Clarification Due:                                                 July 15, 2014 at 1:00 p.m.
Due Date:                                                                                   July 23, 2014 at 4:00 p.m.

This RFP is also posted to the County’s RFP webpage http://www.westchestergov.com/rfp

Thank you,

Philippa Seltzer
Program Coordinator, Youth Services
Westchester County Department of Social Services
112 East Post Rd., 4th Floor
White Plains, NY 10601
Tele: 914-995-5331
Cell: 914-275-2814
Fax: 914-995-5265


Annette M. Peters-Ruvolo, LCSW
Program Director, Community Support Services
Westchester County Department of Community Mental Health
112 East Post Road, 2nd Floor
White Plains, NY 10601
914-995-5278
914-995-6220 (fax)