Office of Block Grant Assistance Vacancy Announcement


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U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Community Planning Development OneCPD Mailing List
Developing Viable Communities through Housing, Services, & Economic Opportunities

Office of Block Grant Assistance Vacancy Announcement


On Friday June 20, 2014, the Office of Block Grant Assistance posted a vacancy announcement for Loan Financing Specialist in Washington, DC. The links are listed below. Please note the closing date for the postings

Loan Financing Specialist

MP14-286-gt (Closes July 7, 2014): https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/373263100
DE14-287-gt (Closes June 27, 2014):
https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/373259700


Reminder: Travel Scholarship Program - CHDO Workshop: Understanding the 2013 HOME Final Rule


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U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Community Planning Development OneCPD Mailing List
Developing Viable Communities through Housing, Services, & Economic Opportunities

Reminder:
Travel Scholarship Program - CHDO Workshop: Understanding the 2013 HOME Final Rule


Travel Scholarships to support attendance by CHDOs and prospective CHDOs are available for the remaining CHDO Workshops on the 2013 HOME Final Rule workshops.
CHDOs should register as soon as possible for the workshops to allow time to receive and submit a Scholarship Request.

Who Can Apply?

Eligible CHDOs and prospective CHDOs with budgetary limitations and are located more than 50 miles from the workshop location. Subject to program limitations, CHDOs can request scholarship assistance to cover eligible transportation and lodging costs with a maximum award of $1,500 per attendee ($2,000 for CHDOs located outside of the continental United States).
A limited number of scholarships are available at each workshop based on HUD’s evaluation of the general proximity of workshops to rural and underserved Participating Jurisdictions.

Instructions

To request a CHDO Travel Scholarship, an organization’s staff must:
  1. Submit a Request to Register and attend one of the CHDO Workshops via the CHDO Workshops Course Page.
  2. Note: Submitting your registration does not guarantee approval.
  3. Receive, complete, and submit a Scholarship Request.
  4. Note: Receipt of a Scholarship Request form does not indicate you have been confirmed for the CHDO Workshop.  To address timing concerns, CHDOs can complete and submit their Scholarship Request while the registration verification process is ongoing.
    Note: Subject to the availability of space in the workshops and the scholarship selection criteria, a single CHDO may be able receive scholarships for up to two staff to attend.
  5. Receive HUD Approval of Scholarship Request.

  6. Enter into a Scholarship Agreement with either of HUD’s Scholarship Program partners, TDA or the Housing Assistance Council, prior to attending the workshop.
Scholarships will be provided on a reimbursement basis following attendance.
Detailed information, including additional selection criteria, is available in the Program Statement.


FY2013 - FY2014 CoC Program Competition: FY2013 Tier 1 New & Tier 2 New and Renewal Projects


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U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development
Community Planning Development
OneCPD Mailing List
Developing Viable Communities through Housing, Services, & Economic Opportunities

FY2013 - FY2014 CoC Program Competition:
FY2013 Tier 1 New & Tier 2 New and Renewal Projects

U.S. Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Secretary Shaun Donovan today announced a second round of grants totaling $140 million to nearly 900 local homeless assistance programs across the country. Provided through HUD's Continuum of Care Program (CoC), the funding announced today will ensure additional permanent housing and transitional housing renewal projects are able to continue operating in the coming year, providing critically needed housing and support services to those persons and families experiencing homelessness. Also included in this announcement are 436 new projects aimed to provide permanent supportive housing for persons experiencing chronic homelessness and to rapidly re-house families with children that are living on the streets or in emergency shelter. View a complete list of all the state and local homeless projects awarded funding.
This year, Continuums of Care were asked to make strategic and hard decisions in order to implement a required 5 percent cut as a result of sequestration. The selection criteria included in the FY2013 - FY2014 CoC Program Competition NOFA allowed HUD to fund all eligible new permanent housing projects requested in Tier 1 and Tier 2, as well as fund permanent housing and transitional housing renewal projects requested in Tier 2. Unfortunately, however, more than 300 otherwise eligible HMIS, Supportive Services Only, Planning and UFA project applications were not awarded funds in this competition.
What is promising is that in spite of the tough budgetary decisions CoCs were forced to make, most CoCs chose to reallocate funds to create new projects following best-practice models that serve those homeless persons most in need which will help communities increase progress towards achieving the goals of Opening Doors.
"Communities all across the country are changing their approach to reducing homelessness and now is not the time to retreat from doing what we know works", said Donovan.  "Investing in proven strategies such as Rapid Re-housing and Housing First help to break the cycle of homelessness as we've known it in these communities."


Adjustments to Funding

The conditional award amounts for many Tier 2 renewal projects are different than the amount requested in the project application. This is because HUD was required to make adjustments to funding in accordance with the HEARTH Act and the CoC Program interim rule. It should be noted that these adjustments were made after the tiers were established, and as follows:
  1. Funds awarded for rental assistance were adjusted by applying the Fair Market Rent (FMR) in effect at the time of award, including in the cases where the FMR for a specific area decreased from the previous year. View the FY2014 Fair Market Rent Limits.
  2.  Funds awarded for operating and leasing in permanent housing projects were increased based on the average increase in FMR amounts within the CoC's geographic area, weighted for population density. Because leasing and operating costs do not decrease relative to rent amounts for specific units (e.g., operating costs for 10 units that have rents of $500 are likely the same as for 10 units that have rents that are $450), adjustments to leasing and operating line items did not include decreases if FMRs decreased in the geographic area.
  3. Funds awarded for rental assistance project administration were decreased if the awarded amount exceeded the 7 percent cap. The amount awarded was reduced back to 7 percent.
  4. Funds awarded for project administration were decreased if the amount awarded exceeded the 10 percent cap. The amount awarded was reduced back to 10 percent.


Technical Assistance

HUD understands that some CoCs with one or more projects that did not get renewed may wish to request Technical Assistance (TA). To make a request for TA:
  1. Go to the Technical Assistance page
  2. Scroll to the bottom of the page
  3. Select Request Technical Assistance
When submitting a request for technical assistance, be prepared to provide:
  1. A detailed description of what you need help with;
  2. A description of why you need help;
  3. An explanation of what the help will allow you to accomplish;
  4. Indicate if the organization and/or political leadership are supportive or open to receiving help and making needed changes in staffing, program design, etc.
Based on the information you provide, HUD will determine the type and level of assistance available to you. If you are a subrecipient organization, meaning you do not receive funds directly from HUD but receive them through a competitive HUD recipient, please contact the recipient so it can submit a TA request for technical assistance on your behalf.


News Alert: HUD Announces $140 Million in Homeless Assistance Grants

June 20, 2014    

POLICY  |  DATA + RESEARCH  |  TOOL + TRAINING  |  NEWS + MEDIA Forward Editor: Emanuel Cavallaro


Spotlight On...
News Alert: HUD Announces $140 Million in Homeless Assistance Grants


The Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Secretary Shaun Donovan today announced $140 million in grant funding for nearly 900 homeless assistance programs. This round of funding completes the Continuum of Care (CoC) Program awards for Fiscal Year (FY) 2013, adding to the $1.6 billion in renewal grants that Secretary Donovan announced in April. The funding will go, in part, to permanent housing and transitional housing renewal projects for individuals and families experiencing homelessness. The funding will also go to permanent supportive housing for chronically homeless individuals and rapid re-housing for families with children.
The funding comes during a year when HUD, in order to implement the required 5 percent cut under sequestration, asked CoCs to make hard budgetary decisions about what programs to prioritize for funding during the FY2013 CoC Program Competition. Consequently, more than 300 otherwise eligible project applications were not awarded funding.
"Communities all across the country are changing their approach to reducing homelessness and now is not the time to retreat from doing what we know works," said Secretary Donovan. "Investing in proven strategies such as Rapid Re-housing and Housing First help to break the cycle of homelessness as we've known it in these communities."

Homelessness Ends with Housing First


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United States Interagency Council on Homelessness - No on should experience homelessness. No one should be without a safe, stable place to call home.
Homelessness Ends with Housing First 
June 19, 2014



Housing First Yields High Success and Creates Real Hope
A Message from USICH Executive Director Laura Green Zeilinger


The Obama Administration fully supports and calls for the adoption of Housing First across all communities - as something that is not just good to do, but as something that we must do to reach our goals.

The adoption of Housing First isn't based on an ideological debate between Housing First and housing readiness; it's based on overwhelming evidence that Housing First yields higher housing retention rates, lower returns to homelessness, and significantly reduces the use of crisis services and institutions. Because of its proven success, Housing First is a core strategy of Opening Doors: Federal Strategic Plan to Prevent and End Homelessness

Simply put, communities that implement Housing First across their systems make the most progress on homelessness. New Orleans has reduced overall homelessness by 83 percent. Phoenix made a huge shift towards the adoption of Housing First, resulting in a 47 percent decrease in chronic homelessness, ending chronic homelessness among Veterans. And Houston has driven down homelessness by nearly 40 percent. These are just to name a few.

Although some communities remain unaware of Housing First's overwhelming success, I honestly do not believe this is our greatest challenge.  




Four Clarifications about Housing First
by Richard Cho, USICH Senior Policy Director

1. Housing First is not a "program." It is a whole-system orientation and response.
When we think of Housing First as a program, it creates the illusion that Housing First is just one among many choices for responding to homelessness. Housing First is a whole-system orientation, and in some cases, a whole-system re-orientation. To borrow a phrase, it is about "changing the DNA" of how a community responds to homelessness.

2. Housing First is a recognition that everyone can achieve stability in (real) housing. Some people simply need services to help them do so.
The problem goes back to thinking about Housing First as a program model. When we instead think of Housing First as an approach and a whole system orientation, it allows us to get away from "one-size-fits-all" solutions, and focus on matching the right level of housing assistance and services to people's needs and strengths.

3. Housing First is about health, recovery, and well-being. Housing itself is the foundation and platform for achieving these goals.
The Housing First approach emphasizes services that focus on housing stability, then using that housing as a platform for connecting people to the types of services and care that they seek and want. It's based on the basic premise that if people have a stable home, they are in a better position to achieve other goals, including health, recovery and well-being than when they are homeless.

4. Housing First is about changing mainstream systems.
Housing First is, and always has been, about changing mainstream systems. In the beginning, Housing First was about changing the mental health system's paradigm to recognize that housing is foundational to mental health recovery, and housing is just as foundational to addiction recovery and psychical well-being as it is to mental health.



Implementing Housing First in Permanent Supportive Housing
New Fact Sheet from USICH

Permanent supportive housing and Housing First should be thought of as two complementary tools for ending chronic homelessness and helping people with disabilities live independently in a community. Permanent supportive housing is a successful and proven programmatic and housing intervention, while Housing First is a framework that can and should be used with permanent supportive housing, as well as with other program models and as a community-wide framework for ending homelessness.  

USICH, with assistance from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, has published a new fact sheet to help service providers understand how Housing First can fit into a permanent supportive housing framework.



100,000 Homes Campaign Surpasses Goal
238 Communities Committed to and Succeeded in Connecting 101,628 People with Permanent Housing in Four Years

USICH Executive Director Laura Zeilinger speaks at 100,000 Homes Campaign Event June 11, 2014.

On June 11, 2014 in a Capitol Hill event, the 100,000 Homes Campaign announced it has achieved its goal to connect 100,000 people experiencing chronic homelessness to safe, stable housing - 101,628 people, to be exact. That number includes 30,000 Veterans, and the campaign estimates that the collaborative work has saved taxpayers $1.3 billion in services, such as emergency room visits, policing, and psychiatric centers. 100,000 Homes is a movement of New York-based Community Solutions.
  




News from Our Partners


HUD Announces Tier 2 CoC Competition Funding

U.S. Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Secretary Shaun Donovan on June 19, 2014, announced a second round of grants totaling $140 million to nearly 900 local homeless assistance programs across the country. Provided through HUD's Continuum of Care Program, the funding will ensure additional permanent and transitional housing renewal projects are able to continue operating in the coming year, providing critically needed housing and support services to those persons and families experiencing homelessness.


Community Service Block Grants Can Be Used as Matching Grants to McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Programs

On June 4, 2014, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Administration for Children and Families Office of Community Services issued clarification through an information memorandum, declaring that CSBG funds can be used to match the Homeless Assistance grants under the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act. These include:
  • the Emergency Solutions Grant 
  • the Continuum of Care program 
  • the Rural Housing Stability Assistance program 
  • the Supportive Housing program 
  • the Shelter Plus Care program


USICH Staff News

Paul Kim
USICH welcomed two dynamic new staff members this month! Paul Kim is a first-year law student at Lewis & Clark Law School. As an extern, Paul works closely with each policy area on projects in family, youth, Veteran and chronic homelessness. 


Jamie Keene
Jamie Keene, a junior at Smith College, is interning with USICH before heading abroad for studies at Oxford University. As a communications and external affairs intern, Jamie will support strategic communication and the production of informational programming.
 

 

  

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Feature
How to Talk about Housing First
Matthew Doherty

By Matthew Doherty, USICH Director of National Initiatives

I recently partnered with the San Diego Regional Continuum of Care Council (RCCC) to host a first-of-its kind discussion locally, billed as Housing First: A Community Conversation for San Diego. I was joined by 25 RCCC members and other stakeholders ready to engage in the dialogue - especially meaningful to me given I live and work in San Diego.

Recognizing that not everyone had the same understanding or support for Housing First approaches, our discussion was structured as a dialogue in which people could express any concerns, questions or disagreements. We wanted to make sure that we could get issues out on the table in a safe environment so that future conversations and trainings could be structured to address the issues raised and help more people, programs, and agencies move toward Housing First approaches in practice. 




Upcoming Webinars You Should Attend



June 26, 2014 | 2 p.m. Eastern

Join USICH Executive Director Laura Zeilinger and Ann Oliva, HUD Acting Deputy Assistant Secretary for Community Planning and Development, in a webinar on Housing First and Rapid Re-Housing. Topics include:
  • The core components of a Housing First approach
  • The core components of the Rapid Re-Housing model
  • Why both of these interventions are critical to the efforts to end homelessness

 Click here to sign up.


SAMHSA-HRSA Webinar: Health Care Begins at Home
June 23, 2014 | 1 p.m. Eastern
The Affordable Care Act creates new opportunities and incentives to align care with health and to address "whole person" health needs. For people experiencing homelessness, housing is critical to health care and better health outcomes. Please join us to learn how SAMSHA and HRSA grantees have successfully integrated primary and behavioral care services and housing to end homelessness. This integration can include partnering with nonprofit housing providers, public housing authorities, or by directly assisting people to obtain affordable housing.

The webinar, moderated by the USICH, will focus on partnerships between mainstream and Health Care for the Homeless health centers, SAMHSA homeless assistance programs, and housing to reduce people's vulnerability to the impacts of homelessness.


In Case You Missed It

The First Lady Announces the Mayors Challenge to End Veteran Homelessness


On June 4, 2014, First Lady Michelle Obama announced a new initiative, spearheaded by USICH, HUD and VA, that aims to secure commitments by local leaders to end Veteran homelessness in the United States in 2015. The Challenge's mission is a central goal of Opening Doors, the Federal plan to prevent and end all forms of homelessness.
Watch the Replay.
There's No Place Like Home: Housing Key to Controlling Health Care Costs
 

Dr. Jeffrey Brenner and Elizabeth Buck write in the Field Clinic blog at Philly.com that "one percent of patients account for 30 percent of all healthcare costs. Nearly 30 percent of the highest users are unstably housed.  For them, there is little that can be done to change their use of the healthcare system until they receive permanent housing. 




Earlier this year, Dr. Brenner, Executive Director of the Camden Coalition of Health Care Providers, gave a HUD talk on hot spotting, a groundbreaking technique mapping resources to respond to the most urgent medical needs - and ultimately led to the connection between homelessness and high medical care costs.  Watch the replay of "A Conversation with Jeffrey Brenner."