Upcoming: Rebroadcast of The eCon Planning Suite Q & A Webinar - January 9, 2014 - 2 PM EST


Is this email not displaying correctly? View it in your browser.
U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Community Planning Development OneCPD Mailing List
Developing Viable Communities through Housing, Services, & Economic Opportunities

Upcoming: Rebroadcast of The eCon Planning Suite Q & A Webinar - January 9, 2014 - 2 PM EST


On Thursday, January 9, 2014 at 2 PM EST the Office of Community Planning and Development (CPD) will host a 90-minute Question and Answer Webinar on the eCon Planning Suite.
This webinar is a repeat of the Question and Answer eCon Planning Suite webinar held on December 5, 2013 due to technical difficulties experienced on that date.
This webinar will include a brief presentation of system updates followed by an open forum for participants to ask questions about the eCon Planning Suite, including the Consolidated Plan and Annual Action Plan templates in IDIS and CPD Maps. The following topics will be reviewed in the webinar:
  • Review steps for copying an Action Plan
  • Adding and New and Existing Projects in the Annual Action Plan
  • New Con Plan Goals and Accomplishments MicroStrategy Report
  • CPD Maps Interface Improvements
Who Should Attend?
The eCon Planning Suite Q&A Webinar is for all grantee staff who use or plan to use the eCon Planning Suite to develop the Consolidated Plan and Annual Action Plan and have some prior knowledge of Con Plan and Annual Action Plan template in IDIS and/or CPD Maps. This webinar is limited to 1,000 participants and registration for this training will close 24 hours before the webinar begins.
Training Point of Contact
hudwebinars@center4si.com | 617-467-6014
To find out more information about upcoming trainings and access materials from previously held trainings, go to OneCPD Training and Events.


Registering for the eCon Planning Suite Training

Access the registration page below and then select Register Now on the right side of the page.
If you have not yet registered for an OneCPD Learn account:
  • Select Create an Account
  • Enter your information on Steps 1 and 2 of the registration page.
  • Select Register
  • You will be brought directly to the course detail page in OneCPD Learn and an email containing your username will be sent to you. Keep this for future use.
  • Select the checkbox next to the class name and location and then select Enroll in this Class
If you have already registered for an OneCPD Learn account:
  • Enter your Username and Password; select Log in
  • If prompted to fill out additional information, please do so, and select Update
  • You will be brought directly to the course detail page in OneCPD Learn
  • Select the checkbox next to the class name and location and then select Enroll in this Class
If you are unsure if you have an OneCPD Learn account:
  • Go to the OneCPD Login page, and enter your email address into the field: Forget Username or Password?
  • If a username for that email address already exists, you will receive an email with a temporary password that you can use to follow the steps above. If not, you’ll receive an error message
Additional Instructions
Additional instructions and screenshots are available in the OneCPD Learn User Guide. After you have successfully registered for OneCPD Learn, you can register for upcoming trainings/webinars.



FY 2013 CoC Program Competition FAQs


Is this email not displaying correctly? View it in your browser.
U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Community Planning Development OneCPD Mailing List
Developing Viable Communities through Housing, Services, & Economic Opportunities

FY 2013 CoC Program Competition FAQs


HUD continues to receive important questions from applicants regarding the FY 2013 Continuum of Care (CoC) Program Competition through the OneCPD Ask A Question (AAQ) portal. New CoC Application and CoC NOFA Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) are available on the e-snaps FAQs page on the OneCPD Resource Exchange.

If you have a question that is not answered by the existing FAQs, please submit your question through the OneCPD AAQ portal. On Step 2 under "My question is related to", select e-snaps.

The OneCPD Homelessness Assistance Programs page provides information on assisting people who are homeless or at risk of becoming homeless. It contains program guidance and homelessness resources for Federal Agencies, government agencies, Continuum of Care organizations, homeless service providers, TA providers, persons experiencing homelessness, and other stakeholders.



New ESG FAQs Posted


Is this email not displaying correctly? View it in your browser.
U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Community Planning Development OneCPD Mailing List
Developing Viable Communities through Housing, Services, & Economic Opportunities

New ESG FAQs Posted


HUD continues to receive important questions from communities regarding the Emergency Solutions Grants (ESG) Program through the OneCPD Ask A Question (AAQ) portal. This week, a new set of 10 Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) for ESG has been posted. These and other ESG FAQs can be found by visiting the ESG FAQs page on the OneCPD Resource Exchange.

Topics addressed in this set include:
  • Designating the HMIS and HMIS lead agency
  • Recording program participants served through match dollars in the CAPER
  • ESG expenditure deadlines
  • Acceptable forms and methodology to track staff time spent on ESG activities
  • Using ESG funds to pay for vehicle registration or gasoline as part of a program participant’s moving expenses
  • Using ESG funds to pay for mortgage assistance
  • Using ESG funds to provide utilities assistance for homeowners at risk of losing their housing
  • Using ESG funds to cover fees and/or security deposits for a service animal
  • Appropriate protocol for security/utility deposits when a program participant leaves the program
If you have a question that is not answered by the existing FAQs, please submit your question through the OneCPD AAQ portal. On Step 2 under "My question is related to", select ESG: Emergency Solutions Grants.

The OneCPD Homelessness Assistance Programs page provides information on assisting people who are homeless or at risk of becoming homeless. It contains program guidance and homelessness resources for Federal Agencies, government agencies, Continuum of Care organizations, homeless service providers, TA providers, persons experiencing homelessness, and other stakeholders.



FY 2013-FY 2014 CoC Program Competition NOFA Correction and Updates

An update to the FY 2013 – FY 2014 CoC Program Competition NOFA has been posted to the OneCPD Resource Exchange, FY2013 Continuum of Care (CoC) Program NOFA: CoC Program Competition page.

Corrections, posted December 20, 2013, include wording changes on pages 36, 37, and 48. Corrections have also been made to internal citations throughout the NOFA. All corrections are noted in red font.

The corrections made to the NOFA will not extend the submission deadline, February 3, 2014, at 7:59:59 p.m. Eastern Time.

Additionally, the FY 2013/FY 2014 CoC Application Detailed Instructions have been revised on pages 32 – 36 to coincide with the corrections made on pages 36 and 37 of the NOFA. The Revised FY 2013/FY 2014 CoC Application Detailed Instructions have been posted on the left menu in e-snaps.

The following FAQs were developed to further clarify form 3A-2 in the FY 2013/FY 2014 CoC Application with Section VII.A.1.b of the NOFA and form 3A-3 of the CoC Application:

  1. What data source should CoCs use to complete the information on form 3A-3 of the FY 2013 - FY 2014 CoC Application?

    In paragraph VII.A.1.c of the NOFA, published on November 22, 2013, HUD stated that CoCs were required to report employment and non-employment income “as reported in all APRs submitted to HUD between October 1, 2012, and September 30, 2013.” However, APRs submitted prior to October 1, 2013 did not include data on increases in employment income from program entry to program exit, and therefore CoCs cannot actually use data from APRs submitted between October 1, 2012 and September 30, 2013.

    Therefore, the FY 2013 - FY 2014 CoC Program Competition NOFA has been revised as have the FY 2013 - FY 2014 CoC Application Detailed Instructions to guide CoCs to instead use HMIS data for questions 3A-3.2a and 3A-3.2b since all CoCs’ HMIS should have updated their systems to allow reporting of income increases. The revised detailed instructions can be found on the left-hand menu of the FY 2013/FY 2014 CoC Application in e-snaps. To respond to questions 3A-3.2a and 3A-3.2b, CoCs must run an HMIS report on CoC-funded projects with an operating end date between July 1, 2012 and June 30, 2013 to determine the percentage of persons who increased (i.e., gained or retained and increased) employment and non-employment income. All HMIS vendors should have the capacity to run this report, consistent with the revised HMIS Programming Specifications published August 2013 associated with Q24b2 of the APR.
     
  2. There appears to be a conflict between the information provided in the FY 2013-FY 2014 CoC Program Competition NOFA for Objective 2 in the FY 2013 - FY 2014 CoC Application, increasing housing stability.  Can HUD clarify what data CoCs should be using to respond to the questions on form 3A-2 of the FY 2013 - FY 2014 CoC Application?

    The information provided in the FY 2013 - FY 2014 CoC Program Competition NOFA published on November 22, 2013 for this objective was incorrect. HUD has published a revision to the FY 2013 and FY 2014 CoC Program Competition NOFA as well as to the FY 2013 - FY 2014 CoC Application Detailed Instructions, which can be found on the left-hand menu of the FY 2013 - FY 2014 CoC Application in e-snaps. For this objective, CoCs should be looking at the percentage of participants in CoC-funded projects that remained in permanent supportive housing, or exited to another permanent housing destination (as reported in APRs submitted to HUD between October 1, 2012, and September 30, 2013).
CoC Program Competition Questions
If you have questions pertaining to e-snaps technical issues or to the NOFA, CoC Application, CoC Priority Listings, or Project Applications, please submit your questions to the e-snaps Ask A Question (AAQ) portal. To submit a question to the e-snaps AAQ portal, select e-snaps from the My question is related to drop down list on Step 2 of the question submission process.The AAQ accepts question submissions 24/7. However, responses are usually provided between 8:00 AM and 5:00 PM Eastern Time, Monday through Friday, except for federal holidays.

If you have questions related to the Interim Rule or a policy related question, please submit your questions to the CoC Program Ask A Question (AAQ) portal. To submit a question to the CoC Program AAQ portal, select CoC Program from the My question is related to drop down list on Step 2 of the question submission process.

Listserv Communications
All information related to the FY 2013-FY 2014 CoC Program Competition is communicated via the OneCPD Mailing List. Join the mailing list to receive important updates and reminders. HUD will communicate via listserv messages:

  • Due date reminders
     
  • Availability of the training guides
     
  • Availability of webcasts
     
  • Important updates or additional information regarding the FY 2013-FY 2014  CoC Program Competition
If you are aware or suspect that the Collaborative Applicant, CoC members, or interested stakeholders are not currently receiving these listserv messages, please forward the following link, https://www.onecpd.info/mailinglist/ to them to register for the listserv messages as this is the ONLY form of communication used to notify everyone of updates, changes, impending deadlines, etc.

Affordable Care Act Enrollment Tips

People who think they may qualify for private health insurance coverage through a Marketplace plan have until December 23, 2013 to enroll and select a plan for coverage starting January 1, 2014. Individuals living in the continental United States (incomes levels differ for Alaska and Hawaii) who make between $11,490 and $45,960 may qualify for subsidized health insurance coverage through the Marketplace in their state.Some individuals, particularly those experiencing homelessness or those living with HIV/AIDS, may be eligible for the Medicaid program in their state. People can apply for Medicaid at any point; there is no open enrollment period. People can apply by contacting their state Medicaid program directly or by filling out an application through the Marketplace in their state.
Visit HUD’s OneCPD Affordable Care Act website for more information.

Register Today: IDIS for HOME PJs Training in Jacksonville, FL

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Office of Affordable Housing Programs is pleased to announce that there will be 25 New HOME IDIS trainings offered at HUD Field Offices in every Region between October 2013 through June 2014. Training for CDBG IDIS will also be forthcoming and will require separate registration.

Please note that only one individual per grantee will be allowed to register and attend a training session.


Jacksonville, FL
February 13, 2014
8:30 AM - 4:30 PM EST
For more information and to view other training locations, visit the IDIS for HOME PJs Training News page.
Instructions on how to register are available in the OneCPD Learn User Guide.
Please note that submitting a registration request does not guarantee you a seat at the training. You will receive a confirmation email if you are accepted into the training.

Community Development Block Grant (CDBG), Section 108, and Related Programs Resource Pages Now Available on theOneCPD Resource Exchange

HUD is pleased to announce the launch of the following resource pages on theOneCPD Resource Exchange:

From these resource pages, grantees can browse:

  • Latest News and Resources
  • Guides and Tools
  • Upcoming Trainings and Training Material
Grantees can also continue to use the OneCPD Resource Exchange Resource Library Search to find resources and the Course Catalog and Calendar to find trainings and events.
The Resource Library page lists all the program, reporting system, and cross cutting requirement resource pages that have launched on the OneCPDResource Exchange. HUD will continue to launch additional resources pages in the coming months.
If you have questions about the OneCPD resource pages, emailinfo@onecpd.info.

Register Today: ESG CAPER Webinar

HUD is hosting a webinar on the ESG Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER) on Thursday, January 16, 2014 from 1:30-3:00 PM ESTThe presentation will focus on how to prepare, complete, and submit the ESG-only portion of the CAPER using the eCon Planning Suite in IDIS while providing context to better understand the transition CAPER and HUD’s expectations for its completion. As the entities required to complete the CAPER, ESG recipients are the primary audience.However, this webinar is also relevant to ESG subrecipients, contractors, and CoCs that are involved in providing data to ESG recipients for the CAPER.
Register for the ESG CAPER Webinar on the OneCPD Resource Exchange.
The OneCPD Homelessness Assistance Programs page provides information on assisting people who are homeless or at risk of becoming homeless. It contains program guidance  and homelessness resources for Federal Agencies, government agencies, Continuum of Care organizations, homeless service providers, TA providers, persons experiencing homelessness, and other stakeholders.

2014 CSH Eastern Region Supportive Housing Conference

March 27-28, 2014

DoubleTree by Hilton, Philadelphia Center City
237 South Broad Street, Philadelphia, PA 19107

REGISTRATION IS OPEN!

The last year has seen monumental developments for supportive housing that expand access to those with the greatest needs and focus on maximizing public resources. This annual conference is designed to keep you on the industry’s leading edge, drawing on best practices from across the eastern United States.
Register by January 31st to receive the early registration rate of $225!



In addition to a full day of workshops and networking onMarch 28, we are pleased to offer two optional
pre-conference activities:


March 27 1:00-4:00pm
Supportive Housing Bus Tour of Philadelphia
($50 - very limited availability)


March 27 1:00-5:00pm
Training Institute
Prioritizing Supportive Housing
Targeting and Coordinated Assessment
($100 - limited availability)


Point-in-Time Survey Tools Available


HUD is providing Continuum of Cares (CoCs) with a set of model surveys to assist them in conducting more effective Point-in-Time (PIT) Counts. These tools can be accessed on the Point-in-Time Survey Tools resource page. While the use of these tools is optional, they reflect the review of best local practices, and were developed with input from leading survey and homeless methodology experts. HUD strongly encourages CoCs to carefully review them and consider the way questions are worded, the order the questions are listed, and the length of the survey if they choose to modify the model surveys or design their own.   

HUD is also providing a mobile PIT application (app) that CoCs can use in counting unsheltered homeless persons. The mobile app is only configured with the observation-based and interview-based PIT surveys. However, HUD anticipates releasing the sheltered- and service-based surveys prior to the 2015 PIT Count. The app will be available for download through Google Play or the Apple App Store in the coming weeks. CoCs can preview the mobile app by clicking the link below from a current web browser. Internet Explorer users must be running either version 10 or 11 in order to properly view this demonstration site.
 
If you have questions about using these PIT tools, please submit them at the Ask a Question page on HUD’s OneCPD Resource Exchange. On Step 2, selectHDX: Homelessness Data Exchange (Including PIT, HIC, and AHAR) from theMy question is related to drop down.

Changing the Terms: How Communities are Leveraging Health Care for PSH Capacity


SOLUTIONS BRIEF | DECEMBER 9, 2013

FILES:CHANGING THE TERMS: HOW COMMUNITIES ARE LEVERAGING HEALTH CARE FOR PSH CAPACITY (PDF | 895 KB | 14 PAGES)

December 9, 2013
The text below is an excerpt. To download the entire document, please click on the link above.

CHANGING THE TERMS: HOW COMMUNITIES ARE LEVERAGING HEALTH CARE FOR PERMANENT SUPPORTIVE HOUSING CAPACITY

In 2013 on a given night, 610,000 people were experiencing homelessness in the United States. Around 92,000 are single adults viewed as chronically homeless, meaning they have a disability and history of long or frequent episodes of homelessness. Health care reform can be a significant component of strategies to end chronic homelessness. The Affordable Care Act (ACA) offers needed resources to states and communities struggling to help individuals, solve their homelessness, and strengthen housing stability. As recognized in Opening Doors, the Federal Strategic Plan to Prevent and End Homelessness, delivering on the promises of the ACA calls for partnerships and collaborations at all levels and across the systems that serve people experiencing homelessness. This paper, describing models that have begun to emerge with ACA implementation, is intended to encourage community leaders to consider opportunities and possible next steps to incorporate health care reform in plans to end chronic homelessness.

FIVE COMMUNITIES – MODELS OF COLLABORATION

Chicago – Network of diverse service providers using new health care resources to reorganize safety net for vulnerable populations, including people who need supportive housing. Together4Health, Appendix, Page 10.
Cleveland – New and renewed partnerships focus on bringing primary care to supportive housing, strengthening recovery of people who have experienced chronic homelessness. Housing First, Appendix, Page 11.
Minneapolis – Homeless services agency teams up with Medicaid managed care organization to integrate housing, primary care and behavioral health for Medicaid enrollees experiencing chronic homelessness. Medica Supportive Housing Initiative, Appendix, Page 12.
Philadelphia – City agency leverages Medicaid funding in strategy to house and support people with behavioral health conditions who need housing to recover. Department of Behavioral Health and Intellectual disAbility, Appendix, Page 13.
Portland, OR – Housing and service providers partner with Medicaid managed care plan to coordinate primary care and long-term supports to end chronic homelessness. HSO, Appendix, Page 14.
Addressing the Needs of People Who Are Chronically Homeless Research shows that people experiencing chronic homelessness are extremely poor and vulnerable, with complex medical, mental health and substance use conditions. These conditions are often co-occurring and may be exacerbated by trauma, injury and physical ailments acquired as a result of homelessness. Despite their severe situations, many chronically homeless people are unable for various reasons to access disability programs such as Supplemental Security Income and Medicaid long-term services and supports. Without any resources, especially health care coverage, they frequently delay seeking care until they are very ill. As a result, people experiencing chronic homeless are heavy users of costly emergency services and hospital care.
There is widespread agreement among policy experts that permanent supportive housing (PSH) is the answer for people who are chronically homeless, and for the safety net systems that serve them. Permanent housing provides a safe setting for recovery and achieving the highest levels of independence in the community. However, housing alone is not sufficient; it must be accompanied by appropriate, voluntary supports – including access to adequate primary and behavioral health care and intensive community-based supports. Research has also shown that PSH is a sound investment for communities, leading to public savings and efficiencies for those with permanent disabling conditions.
Federal policy recognizes the value of PSH for the most vulnerable people experiencing homelessness. However, targeted federal housing resources remain scarce, and communities face significant challenges to develop and sustain the most effective models of PSH to end chronic homelessness.
Opportunities Under Health Care Reform
Certain aspects of health care reform present real opportunities to augment PSH resources and accelerate solutions to chronic homelessness. Taking advantage of these opportunities requires communities to incorporate health care reform into their plans to end homelessness and to act accordingly. Relevant health policy changes for homeless assistance are summarized below.
Medicaid Expansion. The Affordable Care Act of 2010 (ACA) prompts changes in the way communities serve vulnerable people experiencing homelessness. The most important is states’ option to expand Medicaid with generous federal subsidies to cover poor adults – in effect reaching all chronically homeless individuals not already eligible by reason of disability. As a result of a Supreme Court decision in 2011, states can choose to take on this new Medicaid population, but may not be required to do so. When this key provision takes effect in early 2014, around half the states will have opted to expand.
Medicaid expansion under the ACA has implications for ending chronic homelessness on two levels. First, it provides a core set of benefits – including behavioral health coverage – to individuals who have long been excluded from health care insurance. With full state participation, Medicaid would cover up to 16 million more people who are now uninsured. Actual benefits will vary from state to state, within a broad federal framework. In some states, basic Medicaid benefits will be more generous and comprehensive than in other states, as is true of Medicaid generally. Therefore many experts predict that very vulnerable people will continue to face barriers to appropriate health care. Nonetheless, in states that do expand Medicaid, chronically homeless people will have more access to medical services, preventive care, and behavioral health to address mental health and substance use disorders.
Second, coverage for the expanding eligibility group means an influx of Medicaid dollars to local service systems, creating strategic opportunities to reset state and local safety-net funding priorities. For example, as more clinical services are reimbursed by Medicaid instead of local general funds, a county mental health department could use those local funds to offer more rental subsidies, or increase case management in supportive housing. Other federal funding, such as substance abuse and mental health block grants, could also be repurposed in targeted ways.
Community-Based Services and Supports. Apart from expanding the number of people in Medicaid, the ACA expands capacity for communities to serve and support people with disabilities and other vulnerabilities. Very generally, these include a menu of state options and incentives for Medicaid home and community-based services (HCBS), and more funding for community-health centers, among other provisions. With appropriate federal and state approvals, Medicaid HCBS can fund a number of long-term services and supports that have not traditionally been considered “medical” for the purposes of Medicaid coverage. Community health centers, with long experience and competence meeting the needs of underserved populations, will be critical points of access for new Medicaid enrollees with high health risks, as well as those who continue to be uninsured.
Health Homes. To address chronic homelessness and enhance supportive housing, one promising new state option is a voluntary care coordination program for Medicaid enrollees with severe mental illness or other chronic disabling conditions. Known as a health home, this benefit reimburses qualified providers for some of the tasks of organizing the diverse services needed to stabilize people with complicated health care needs. States have flexibility in how they design health homes. In some states, Medicaid health homes are a function of mental health departments. In others, community health providers – including those that offer supportive housing – can be eligible for the program.
Mental Health Parity. Another important federal health policy that will be implemented along with the ACA is behavioral health parity under the Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act of 2008. This law is expected to elevate and standardize coverage of mental health and addiction treatment, relative to other health benefits. New Medicaid benefits for the expanded population group are required to meet parity standards.
Overall Policy Directions. Health policy analysts refer to the “triple aim” of the ACA, in that the goals of the legislation as a whole are to increase access, improve quality, and lower total health care costs over time. The triple aim will guide ACA implementation in how delivery systems will be given new resources and how their outcomes will be evaluated.

NHSDC Conference Registration is Now Open!

Conference Registration is Now Open! 

Our Spring Conference will be held in Minneapolis, Minnesota on May 1-2, 2014The Spring Conference Planning Team is putting together a great conference.  The conference opens at 8:00am on May 1, 2014 and ends at 5:00pm on May 2, 2014. Breakfast and lunch are provided.  Please Register Here: Online Registration.  Our recent conferences have sold out so please register early.  Our Preliminary Agenda will be released at the end of January.  Check the NHSDC.org website for more conference information as it becomes available.

Hotel Reservations Now Available.
A block of rooms have been reserved at a reduced rate of $149.00 (not including tax and fees). This room rate is guaranteed until April 2, 2014 or until the room block is full.

Millennium Hotel
1313 Nicollet Mall
Minneapolis, MN, USA 55403-2697
Conference Rate: $149.00 (not including tax and fees)
Consider reserving your hotel room today: Online Reservation.

2014 HIC & PIT Data Collection Notice and Webinar


In anticipation of the upcoming 2014 Housing Inventory Count (HIC) and Point-in-Time (PIT) count of homeless persons, HUD has published the Notice for Housing Inventory Count (HIC) and Point-in-Time (PIT) Data Collection for Continuums of Care (CoC). The Notice informs CoCs of information that must be collected in order to successfully complete the 2014 HIC and PIT count.

Changes to the 2014 HIC:

  • To better align program components with the CoC Program interim rule, permanent housing (PH) has been added as a program component. Permanent supportive housing (PSH) and rapid re-housing (RRH) will be distinct categories under the permanent housing component.
     
  • For purposes of the HIC, CoCs must only count RRH beds and units for which rental assistance from any source is being provided on the night of the count.
     
  • CoCs that have one of the 23 Rapid Re-housing Demonstration (RRHD) projects, funded in the FY 2008 CoC Competition, must identify the Project Type as DEM.
     
  • CoCs must identify the number of beds within projects that are dedicated to veterans and youth. For dedicated youth beds, CoCs must indicate the age group that the beds are dedicated to serve (i.e., only children under 18, only persons 18 to 24, or persons up to 24). CoCs will not need to identify whether projects target veterans, per Target Population B, since identifying the number of beds dedicated to veterans serves the same purpose and provides more precise information about project targeting.
     
  • The term “provider program” has been changed to “project” throughout the Notice.
Changes to the 2014 PIT:

All CoCs must continue to complete a PIT count that is based on actual counts and/or statistically reliable data. To further support collection and reporting of complete and accurate data:

  • HUD provides additional guidance about counting standards and methodologies in A Guide to Counting Sheltered Homeless People andA Guide to Counting Unsheltered Homeless People. CoCs should refer to that guidance and any updates HUD publishes for further guidance on counting guidance and methodologies.
     
  • CoCs must report race, ethnicity, and gender data for all persons counted.
     
  • CoCs must report population data for veteran households. Because CoCs are reporting the population data for veteran households the veteran subpopulation requirements have been removed.
     
  • The term “disability” has been added to Appendix B and the subpopulation categories for “chronic substance abuse” and “severely mentally ill” have been revised.
     
  • The sum total number of persons reported in emergency shelter, Safe Havens, and transitional housing projects in the PIT fields of the HIC must match the sum total of sheltered persons reported in the PIT count.
     
  • CoCs that have RRHD projects must not include persons in those projects in the PIT count.
HUD encourages CoCs to engage their homeless assistance partners, including the Department of Veterans Affairs, Runaway and Homeless Youth providers, Local Education Liaisons, and critical local agencies and service providers, to assist with achieving the most accurate count of homeless persons in their areas. HUD commends you for your great work and is grateful to be a partner with you in this critical effort.

Webinar: Preparing for Your 2014 Housing Inventory and Point-in-Time Counts
HUD will host a webinar on the 2014 HIC and PIT Count on Thursday, December 12, 2013

, from 3-4 p.m. ET. The webinar will highlight new requirements and data collection guidance for the 2014 HIC and PIT Counts. Information on how to register for this webinar will be issued the week of December 2nd.

Additional Tools
To assist communities in conducting their counts HUD plans to release several tools in the coming weeks. HUD will be providing sample surveys that CoCs may use. The samples were prepared by professional survey staff in conjunction with homeless experts. HUD will also release a mobile PIT application that incorporates the sample surveys in a convenient mobile app. While HUD believes all of these tools will be useful to communities, HUD is not requiring that CoCs use them – rather they are intended to be tools that the CoCs can review and evaluate whether they want to use them in the 2014 or future counts. Finally, HUD will also be providing updated guidance on counting methodologies to replace A Guide to Counting Sheltered Homeless People andA Guide to Counting Unsheltered Homeless People

Questions about the HIC, PIT, or unmet need?
If you have questions about entering HIC or PIT data that are not covered in this Notice, please submit them at the Ask a Question page on HUD’s OneCPD Resource Exchange. On Step 2, select the HDX Reporting System in the “My question is related to” dropdown.

VA and HUD Announce Twenty-Four Percent Reduction in Veterans’ Homelessness since 2010


November 21, 2013

WASHINGTON – The Department of Veterans Affairs and the Department of Housing and Urban Development today announced that a new national report shows a 24 percent reduction in homelessness among Veterans since 2010.
The report also showed an 8 percent reduction between January 2012 and January 2013. The decline keeps the Obama administration on track to meet the goal of ending Veterans’ homelessness in 2015. 
“We are on the right track in the fight to end homelessness among Veterans.  While this trend is encouraging news, we know that there is more work to do,” said Secretary of Veterans Affairs Eric K. Shinseki. “As President Obama said, we’re not going to rest until every Veteran who has fought for America has a home in America.  The results in the latest report are a credit to the effort given by our dedicated staff, and our federal, state, and community partners who are committed to ending Veterans’ homelessness.”
“We’re making real and significant progress to reduce homelessness in this country and now is not the time to retreat from doing what we know works,” said U.S. Housing and Urban Development Secretary Shaun Donovan.  “If we’re going to end homelessness as we know it, we need a continued bipartisan commitment from Congress to break the cycle trapping our most vulnerable citizens, especially our Veterans, between living in a shelter or a life on the streets.  I understand these are tough budget times but these are proven strategies that are making a real difference.  We simply can’t balance our budget on the backs of those living on the margins.”
The 2013 Point-in-Time Estimates of Homelessness, prepared by HUD, estimates there were 57,849 homeless Veterans on a single night in January in the United States, an 8 percent decline since 2012 and a 24 percent decline since 2010. 
VA has made ending Veterans’ homelessness by the end of 2015 a top priority, undertaking an unprecedented campaign to dramatically increase awareness of VA services for homeless Veterans and Veterans at risk of becoming homeless.  While the number of homeless people in the United States dropped by 4 percent since 2012, according to the 2013 report, Veterans’ homelessness has shown a more robust decline.  During a period of prolonged economic recovery, the Obama Administration has been able to reduce the number of homeless Veterans by 24 percent, breaking previous patterns of increased homelessness during difficult economies.
Earlier this year, HUD and VA also announced the award of nearly $70 million of HUD-Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing grants to further assist in addressing the issue of Veterans’ homelessness.  The program combines rental assistance from HUD with case management and clinical services provided by VA.  Since 2008, a total of 58,140 vouchers have been awarded and 43,371 formerly homeless Veterans are currently in homes of their own because of the joint HUD-VA program.
One of the tools VA uses in its systematic approach to prevent and end Veterans’ homelessness is the Supportive Services for Veteran Families grant program.  In July, VA announced the award of nearly $300 million in grants to 319 community agencies to help approximately 120,000 homeless and at-risk Veterans and their families.
More recently, VA has announced $8.8 million in grants for 164 projects to acquire vans for homeless providers and to rehabilitate housing, plus $4.9 million in grants for 25 community-based projects to enhance services for Veterans.
The grants promote housing stability among homeless and at-risk Veterans and their families.  The grants can have an immediate impact, helping lift Veterans out of homelessness or providing aid in emergencies that put Veterans and their families at risk of homelessness. 
More information about VA’s homeless programs is available at www.va.gov/homeless.  Details about the Supportive Services for Veteran Families program are online at www.va.gov/homeless/ssvf.asp.

VA Approves $8.8 Million in Grants to Provide Transportation and Renovated Housing for Homeless Veterans


November 12, 2013


WASHINGTON—The Department of Veterans Affairs has approved $8.8 million in grants to fund 164 projects in 37 states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico to rehabilitate currently operational transitional housing projects and acquire vans to facilitate the transportation needs of homeless Veterans. 
“President Obama has made eliminating Veterans’ homelessness a national priority,” said Secretary of Veterans Affairs Eric K. Shinseki.  “We want every Veteran who faces homelessness to know that VA is here to help.  The Grant and Per Diem Program provides significant assistance to those who need it.”
The grants awarded through the Grant and Per Diem (GPD) Program are for currently operational grantees, who will use this funding to rehabilitate their current project locations to enhance safety, security and privacy for the homeless Veterans they serve.  Additionally, funding for these organizations to acquire vans will assist homeless Veterans with transportation to medical appointments and employment opportunities, as well as enable grantees to conduct outreach within their communities.
GPD helps close gaps in available housing for the nation’s most vulnerable homeless Veterans, including men and women with children, Indian tribal populations, and Veterans with substance use and mental health issues.  Community-based programs funded by GPD provide homeless Veterans with support services and housing.  GPD grants are offered annually as funding is available by VA’s homeless Veterans programs.
Lisa Pape, National Director of Homeless Programs, which oversees GPD, said, “These grant awards are a reinvestment in the community that will strengthen community services around the country so that homeless Veterans have access to safe and secure housing and receive quality support and services.
“The 2013 GPD grant awards represent an ongoing commitment to VA’s community partners.  These awards will make community-based GPD facilities safer and secure, ensuring that our community partners continue to provide excellent mental health support, employment assistance and job training with the essential component of housing,” Pape added. “Whether it is aid in overcoming substance use or finding a job, a community helping hand is exactly what these Veterans need to lead a better quality of life.”
Since 2009, homelessness among Veteran has decreased more than 17 percent.  As part of President Obama’s and Shinseki’s five-year plan to eliminate Veteran homelessness by 2015, VA has committed over $1 billion in fiscal year 2014 to strengthen programs that prevent and treat the many issues that can lead to Veteran homelessness.
More information about VA’s homeless programs is available at www.va.gov/homeless.  Details about the GPD Program are online at www.va.gov/homeless/GPD.asp.
To help a homeless Veteran or Veteran at risk of homelessness, refer them to the National Call Center for Homeless Veterans, 1-877-4AID-VET, or direct them to www.va.gov/homeless.  The hotline connects homeless Veterans, Veterans at risk of becoming homeless and their families with the VA services and benefits they have earned.

Secretary Shinseki Announces an Additional $4.9 Million to Help Eliminate Veterans Homelessness


November 12, 2013

WASHINGTON – The Department of Veterans Affairs announced today that 25 projects in 11 different states will share approximately $4.9 million in grants to provide enhanced services for homeless Veterans this year.  This is in addition to the approximately $300 million in preventive grants awarded earlier this year through the Supportive Services for Veteran Families (SSVF) program.
“Our local partners have played a vital role in our effort to find, engage, and rescue every homeless Veteran,” said Secretary of Veterans Affairs Eric K. Shinseki.  “Until no Veteran has to sleep on our Nation’s streets, we still have work to do.”
As a key component of VA’s plan to eliminate homelessness among Veterans, VA’s Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem Program funds  community agencies that provide services to homeless Veterans.  The program promotes the development and provision of supportive housing and services with the goal of helping homeless Veterans achieve residential stability, increase their skill levels and income, and obtain greater self-determination.
On a single night in January 2012, a national count of homeless Veterans totaled 62,619, which was more than 17 percent below the figure for 2009.  As part of President Obama’s and Secretary Shinseki’s plan to eliminate Veteran homelessness in 2015, VA has committed over $1 billion in fiscal year 2014 to strengthen programs that prevent and treat the many issues that can lead to Veteran homelessness.
For more information, visit VA’s website for the National Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem Office atwww.va.gov/homeless/GPD.ASP.  Additionally, VA has a National Call Center for Homeless Veterans, 1-877-4AID VET (1-877-424-3838), http://www.va.gov/HOMELESS/NationalCallCenter.asp.